CSUN students will be protesting budget cuts and fee hikes on Wednesday

CSUN students are preparing to protest against budget cuts on Wednesday, March 2.

The Activist Student Coalition (ASC) is organizing the Day of Action along with 13 other campus organizations that wish to further education.

They plan to gather in front of the Oviatt Library at 10 a.m. and proceed with rallies and a march around the campus’ perimeter.

A lecture by the Rev. James Lawson, a civil rights activist who worked with Martin Luther King Jr. will be held at 3 p.m. in front of the library.

ASC will also present an alternative education budget for the state of California and petition for signatures.

Justin Marks, 22, one of the students arrested during last year’s March 4 protest will be participating this time around as an ASC leader.

“People are increasingly aware that their education is being attacked,” Marks said.

According to ASC, the Day of Action was planned to “raise awareness about the importance of affordable and accessible education.”

Students, faculty and community members will have the opportunity to voice their opinions regarding education and the increase of tuition throughout the day. Forums will be available for the public to speak up.

CSUN police has been cooperative with the plans for March 2, Marks said.

An all-day city permit has been attained by the organization to walk on the streets surrounding the campus.

The streets will be blocked off when people are marching.

The march around CSUN will imitate last year’s protest when students, faculty and community members walked with signs in hand on Reseda Boulevard, Nordhoff Street and Zelzah Avenue.

“There was never an intent to be violent (last year),” Marks said. “Our intent is the same this year.”

Students plan to join in on the Day of Action for different reasons.

Junior Kailyn Aaron-Lozano, 22, history major, and a deaf student, said she is participating in the protest because access to interpreters has been reduced and the quality of her education is being affected.

“Even though I cannot be heard I want to show my voice with my hands and signs,” Lozano said.

Another student who is participating is junior Andy Partida, 21, criminal justice major.

“I do not agree with the fee hikes and if we do not do anything about it, it will just continue,” Partida said.

But not all are aware of the March 2 protest like junior Jairo Arreola, 25.

“I just saw the posters today (Monday),” said the sociology major. “It does not really affect me because I served in the military and it pays for my education.”

Many students said although they would like to participate, they do not have time. One of those students was senior Artin Tersaakoyan, 22.

“I would participate if I had time,” said the philosophy major. “The tuition hikes are not extreme but they do affect (us).”

The organizations planning the Day of Action are hoping to get the message across so people become educated about budget issues.

“(We) hope to build unity on this campus,” Marks said.

The Day of Action will begin at 10 a.m. and is scheduled to end around 6 p.m.

  • CSUNStudent

    Here is a quote from the article:
    “An all-day city permit has been attained by the organization to walk on the streets surrounding the campus.

    The streets will be blocked off when people are marching.

    The march around CSUN will imitate last year’s protest when students, faculty and community members walked with signs in hand on Reseda Boulevard, Nordhoff Street and Zelzah Avenue.”

    Let me get this straight: these protesters will be blocking traffic and interrupting hundreds of innocent people again? It sounds like people trying to get to or from work or school, and anyone in the course of their job, will be blocked by these protesters who don’t think we are taking enough of the taxpayers’ hard-earned money?

    • makeadifference

      I have two comments to make
      1. People have advance notice of the events occurring and time to plan their routes across town accordingly. People don’t complain about being “blocked” when the streets are shut down for the school’s annual 5-k fundraiser or street construction paid for with tax dollars.
      2. Fee hikes not only affect those who are attending the CSU system at this moment, it affects the children who will be attending in the future. If we do not stop it now, the only people who will be able to receive the necessary education to not be considered under the poverty line will be the offspring of pretentious, financially over privileged individuals. Leading to a larger gap between the upper and lower social economic classes within this country and adding to the already elevated unemployment rate.

      • David the small-L libertarian

        No, the “offspring of pretentious, financially over-privileged individuals” will be going to a private university whose parents will still be paying the taxes that subsidize your sub-standard education at CSUN.

        • not if those private universities are made of wood, the forthcoming termite invasion will eradicate all buildings made of wood.

        • CSUNStudent

          Normally I agree with much of what you write on this website, but not every program at CSUN is sub-standard…

          • David the small-L libertarian

            You’re correct; in particular, I understand that CSUN’s business and engineering programs are quite good. However, here’s an example of CSUN’s shortcomings from CSUN professor David Klein: http://www.csun.edu/~vcmth00m/MajorMathMess.html

            I also understand that CSUN is a “victim” of the abysmal public-school system. In order to meet its enrollment and diversity goals, it must lower its admission standards and require significant numbers of students to take remedial math and English courses–studying in college what they should have learned in high school.

            I’ve had many personal experiences with the low functioning level of student here at CSUN. I’ve seen writing by US-born CSUN students that I would swear were written by a 13-year-old. Maybe these students improved vastly by graduation time, or maybe they just dropped out.

          • Dadivaa

            David, where did you receive your education?

          • David the small-L libertarian

            I have a public high-school education and took some night classes at a community college. I quit school because it was too much to work full time and take college classes. It was my choice to do so as my parents were willing to pay for me to go to CSUN.

            I’d say that the most valuable portion of my education is what I learned on my own, outside of the classroom setting.

          • CSUNStudent

            I too have seen the writing “skills” of some fellow students. I was fortunate enough to have had good English teachers in high school and good English professors at CSUN. I know that is definitely not the case for everyone, though!

    • im with you man, today i was at the drive thru in Mcdonalds and there was a small kid just lying on the ground there and not moving, after honking my horn for 5 minutes i got real mad, i wasnt about to put my car in reverse and park and go inside the mcdonalds, that would be too much of an inconvenience, so i just ran over the kid and got my big mac, supersized of course

    • David the small-L libertarian

      Yep, I’m going to call it the March of the Ingrates.

      • Chuangtroll

        Maybe instead of flexing your ego on this page you could actually go out and do something meaningful. Oh, wait, that’s for substandards right? All you have to do is sit in your cage and rattle the bars to feel better about yourself. Well played!

        • David the small-L libertarian

          Why don’t you tell the people whom you agree with the same thing?

          I have some opinions that are somewhat atypical for the liberal college environ and think it’s important that students are exposed to alternative views. Hope you don’t mind.

          • AnotherCSUNStudent

            The “offspring of pretentious, financially over-privileged individuals” (makeadifference, 3/1/11, 02:04PM) aren’t necessarily “going to a private university.” Presently, many individuals whose parents are wealthy enough never complete his or her education past high school. And besides, some of their parents don’t even “pay taxes” (including those) “that subsidize [our] sub-standard education at CSUN” (David the small-L libertarian, 3/2/11, 07:10PM).

          • David the small-L libertarian

            So they don’t pay taxes? You simply have no idea what you’re talking about: http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2009/05/the-rich-pay-more-taxes-top-20-percent-pay-record-share-of-income-taxes

  • CSUNStudent

    Here is a quote from the article:
    “An all-day city permit has been attained by the organization to walk on the streets surrounding the campus.

    The streets will be blocked off when people are marching.

    The march around CSUN will imitate last year’s protest when students, faculty and community members walked with signs in hand on Reseda Boulevard, Nordhoff Street and Zelzah Avenue.”

    Let me get this straight: these protesters will be blocking traffic and interrupting hundreds of innocent people again? It sounds like people trying to get to or from work or school, and anyone in the course of their job, will be blocked by these protesters who don’t think we are taking enough of the taxpayers’ hard-earned money?