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Cirque Chinois stuns audience with incredible feats of human agility

Watching the National Circus of the People’s Republic of China almost made up for not watching the summer Olympics.

The traveling group of Chinese acrobats and dancers gave a performance filled with technical precision, visually tantalizing choreography and costume design and gravity-defying stunts that kept my gut churning with nervousness and excitement throughout the show.

The circus returned after their first debut at the Valley Performing Arts Center last year, where they performed as the National Acrobats of the People’s Republic of China. This year’s show, Cirque Chinois (French for Chinese circus), included much of the same, internationally respected acts such as the “Great Teeterboard,” “Grand Flying Trapeze” and “Group Contortion.”

The atmosphere was elegant, but the music and exotic costumery evoked a sense of ominous mystery. I was full of curiosity and anticipation. The show opened with what seemed to be a romantic dance between a male and female performer; a synchronized and seamless frolick held by ropes in the air. Dressed in jewel tones and gentle lighting, the two dancers seemed to be a prince and a princess, dancing above their kingdom. Maybe the circus pivoted around these characters and their story, I thought to myself by the end of their dance.

However, my assumption proved wrong, since each act of the show didn’t seem to have much to do with the previous. Rather than telling an epic tale, Cirque Chinois was more of a collection of intriguing acts; men flying through stacks of hoops, women balancing sets of china while balancing other women, and martial-arts inspired dances and stunts which struck awe and fear into the audience.

Despite the wonder, at times I was thrown back into reality because of sudden changes in the music. Better transitions and surround sound could have made the performance more entrancing. I did not get the total feeling of being transported to a magical, far-off land, but perhaps just in a half-asleep dream disturbed by moments of reality.

Deferred action program may temporarily help undocumented students

Deportation has often been a fear for undocumented students, but now some students are worrying less because of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Ana Miriam Barragan was 10-years-old in 2001, when she and her family crossed the border into the U.S. from Mexico with the help of a “coyote,” a person hired to help immigrants into the country.

“I had fake paperwork and just crossed the border in a car,” she said. “There were other people in it, but I didn’t know them. My family and I crossed on different days.”

Once they were in California, they headed north to Mendocino County where her aunt and uncle who were both citizens took them in.

In 2009, Barragan graduated high school. She immediately enrolled at CSUN to major in deaf studies and received scholarships with help from her local community in Mendocino County. But going to school as an undocumented student meant living in constant fear.

In June, the Department of Homeland Security officials announced they will stop targeting undocumented children and students for deportation, due to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ website, deferred action “is a discretionary determination to defer removal action of an individual as an act of prosecutorial discretion,” and “does not provide an individual with lawful status.”

Ana Miriam Barragan, an undocumented student, came to California when she was ten years old. She came from Mexico and has been living as an undocumented person ever since. She currently attends CSUN as a deaf studies and psychology major. Photo credit: Danielle Hale / Daily Sundial

The department requires that undocumented people who qualify under this program need to renew a permit every two years.

Any information that is used in the application process is then protected from disclosure to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, according to Sharon Rummery, public affairs officer at USCIS.

Barragan applied after hearing about the deferred action program, which began accepting applications Aug. 15.

The program has allowed millions of undocumented students to study and work in the U.S. without the threat of deportation.

“There is no date for when applications need to be submitted,” Rummery said. “Anyone can apply once they reach 16 years of age.”

The Migration Policy Institute estimates that around 1.2 million people are immediately eligible for the program and 500,000 more will be eligible soon after, according to James Mitchell, professor of political science at CSUN.

Barragan and her siblings are among those immediately eligible. Her older sister and younger brother have both enrolled in the program and still live in northern California.

Those who choose to apply for the program must prove they have been in the U.S. for five consecutive years and must also provide their original birth certificates, high school diplomas or GEDs, as well as high school and college transcripts.

Applicants cannot have felony or misdemeanor charges against them. Judy London, directing attorney of Public Counsels Immigration Rights Project, suggests that anyone looking for information on the program, especially if they have a criminal record, seek consultation with an immigration lawyer or attend workshops that are offered.

For Barragan, the fear of deportation will be gone, but that was not the case for her Mexican parents.

Her father was deported earlier this year, and after long family discussions, her mother returned to Mexico shortly after.

“I’m disappointed that the program can’t help my parents,” Barragan said. “My mom deserved to stay. I don’t feel I am any more deserving than she is.”

Barragan believes that the program is a step in the right direction, but knows it isn’t granting her amnesty or residency. She also knows the program was timed for the election year, with President Obama and the Democrats trying to capture more of the Latino vote.

“The timing of this program is certainly political,” said Maria Rosa Garcia-Acevedo, professor of political science at CSUN. “But this is hardly a surprise. Through this action, Obama showed he was able to do something meaningful for undocumented students and children.”

Abigail Arias, 22, who graduated from CSUN with a double major in psychology and Spanish last year, also came to the U.S. in 2001 when she was 11-years-old. Like Barragan, she traveled by car to the Mexican border and used a cousin’s birth certificate to get into California.

She started elementary school immediately and graduated high school in 2007, afterward enrolling at CSUN.

Because undocumented students are not eligible for federal financial aid, Arias had to find other ways to pay for college. Her father helped pay for her first semester while she researched scholarships that were offered to undocumented students.

She received scholarships through the Chicano/a studies and Spanish programs and then paid for her final year with money she received from work.

Despite having graduated from CSUN, Arias’ future was uncertain.

“My dad had a contact for a company in Mexico,” she said. “Everything was planned and then news about the program came up. I was excited, but a lot of questions came up: What do I need to do? What could happen? Is there something else to this?”

Arias started researching the program and her family decided to hire an immigration lawyer to help them with the application process. She was worried that a traffic ticket would count against her.

London said it can be a good idea to consult with an immigration lawyer even for something as small as a traffic ticket.

“Those who don’t have a criminal history, at a minimum, should get solid information from a lawyer,” London said. “Or a responsible organization that has a lawyer on staff.”

Arias and her four other siblings were in the clear. She finished and signed her application Sept. 10. She’s wary about the fate of the program, especially after the presidential election ends this year.

“It could be scary if Romney wins the election in November,” she said. “What will happen to the program?”

Jeff Biggers will speak on Arizona immigration laws at CSUN

The speed limit: 65. The car speed: 80. Police lights begin the strobe of red and blue as a siren hollers and the 80-mile-an-hour car is directed to the side of Interstate 10 leaving Phoenix. As the cop approaches, he sees a man who appears to be Latino. The man rolls down the window, and the officer crinkles his eyebrows. “You were speeding. Now, show me your papers, please.”

This hypothetical scenario may become the reality of all Latinos in Arizona with the “Show me your papers” provision of the state’s infamous Senate Bill 1070 law in effect since Sept. 18.

SB 1070 passed in the spring of 2010 and has since been at the top of many political discussions as to whether demanding papers from suspected undocumented immigrants is a new form of racial profiling.

Much confusion has arisen over the law with many people believing that cops can approach anyone and demand citizenship documentation without reason.

According to Arizona legislature’s Senate Bill 1070, immigrants are required to carry registration documents at all times, but an officer may only demand proof of citizenship during other “lawful contact.” The bill states that during any lawful contact made by law enforcement officials where suspicion exists that the person is in the U.S. illegally, an attempt shall be made to determine the person’s immigration status.

Jeff Biggers, an author, journalist and historian who is speaking at CSUN Tuesday, wrote his latest book about contradictions, myths and facts of Arizona’s history and civil and labor rights conflicts. “State Out of the Union: Arizona and the Final Showdown Over the American Dream” criticizes SB 1070 and what Biggers calls the “Arizonification of America.” Photo Credit: Courtesy of Steve Stearns

Origin of the Arizona laws
Jeff Biggers, an author, journalist and historian who is speaking at CSUN Tuesday, wrote his latest book about contradictions, myths and facts of Arizona’s history and civil and labor rights conflicts. “State Out of the Union: Arizona and the Final Showdown Over the American Dream” criticizes SB 1070 and what Biggers calls the “Arizonification of America.”

“The media flooded viewers with the images of gun-toting anti-immigrant extremists including neo-Nazis, Tea Party yahoos and fringe political figures,” Biggers said. “But there is another side of Arizona, like any other state, and an inspiring legacy of resistance that has fought back through extraordinary movements, campaigns and struggles, helped to shape the national liberal and conservative agendas and will ultimately have a more lasting impact on our history.”

After a rancher was shot in the borderlands, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer and former Arizona State Senator Russell Pearce “manufactured the immigration crisis for a larger state’s right political agenda,” claimed Biggers, who was raised in Tucson, Arizona. He also said Brewer’s poll ratings soared after her crackdown on immigration, even though “rates of violent crime along the Mexican border had been falling for years.”

Another controversial Arizona law passed in May of 2010 was Brewer’s approved ban on ethnic studies classes, House Bill 2281. The bill states public school students “should not be taught to resent or hate other races or classes of people,” which has singled out Chicano/a studies as an example of this.

The bill restricts courses that “promote the overthrow of the U.S. government, promote resentment toward a race or class of people, are designed primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group, and/or advocate ethnic solidarity instead of the treatment of pupils as individuals.”

Banning an identity
Professor Rudy Acuna sipped his coffee, set down the Freudian Sip cup and lifted his hands to the rim of his glasses. Acuna, the founding chair of CSUN’s Chicano/a studies department, removed the black frames from his face and exposed his emotional eyes. He described his struggle to keep only the truth in the minds of students.

“I’ve been banned before and lost a job because people said I was lying about the U.S. invading Mexico,” said Acuna, 80. “Every document of the time said the U.S. did invade Mexico. They want to change the truth, and I don’t want to change the truth.”

Acuna said the biggest danger is the escalation of Arizona-inspired laws into other states like Alabama and Pennsylvania, and he hopes students go to Biggers’ appearance on campus and understand the severity of the situation.

“This is real, and students don’t think it’s real,” Acuna urged with concern. “I hope they go listen, get encouraged and go to Arizona and other places with injustice and get involved in changing things.”

Grace Castaneda, a senior political science major, is a member of the M.E.Ch.A (Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan) club at CSUN, or Chicano/a Student Movement of Aztlan, which is one of the largest and oldest Chicano/a student organizations in the country.

The CSUN branch has held fundraisers to help Arizona citizens pay for lawyers and fees in their court cases dealing with SB 1070 and HB 2281, but as a Chicana, Castaneda is still concerned for the future of the programs.

“The MAS program (Mexican-American studies) is one the most successful and biggest programs in Arizona, so if they knock out the main layer, it would be very simple to knock out Asian-American studies, Pan-African studies, Jewish studies and any programs minorities are a part of,” Castaneda warned. “For people to ban this is like they are banning your identity.”

Not just for Arizona
Beyond theoretically banning minorities’ identities as Castaneda mentioned, Biggers believes these types of laws have potential to affect everyone, not only minority groups in Arizona.

“Racial profiling dehumanizes all of us, regardless of your ethnicity, and we all need to confront the civil rights violations of such laws in Arizona and in any place,” Biggers said.

USU’s first ‘Soulful Saturdays’ event of the semester

>>CORRECTION: Soulful Saturdays is a monthly event, not weekly as stated in the article.

Singers and CSUN alumni Jessica Samiere and Angelica Abrams performed a collection of songs for students and guests, earning cheers and applause from the seat-filled Pub Sports Grill at theUSU’s first “Soulful Saturdays” event of the semester on Sept. 29.

The event was free for students and $5 for non-students. The weekly event features local musicians chosen by the event planning staff and will vary in genre each week, according to event planner Quinesha Summerville, 21.

Summerville, a senior theater major, said the event is a safe and affordable option for students.

“Soulful Saturdays is a night out for students, and it’s something safe and cost-effective with free music and free food,” said Summerville, theater major.

Some of the future themes include jazz, indie rock and alternative, country and Latin.

To read more click here.

 

Saudi National Day is celebrated at CSUN

Abdulaziz Aljaman, 26, MSE major and current CSUN Saudi Students Association president, addresses and thanks the crowd for attending the 82nd annual Saudi National Day on Friday at the USU. Ethnic food and live dance were among the list of activities offered to those in attendance. Photo credit: Leah Oakes/ Contributor

The Saudi Student Association celebrated Saudi Arabian National Day at the USU Grand Salon on Friday and featured traditional food, clothing, music and dance.

The Grand Salon was decorated in green and white, the colors of the Saudi Arabian flag. The men wore thobs, which are traditional Saudi Arabian clothing. A picture of King Abduliziz and the crown prince Salman was featured at the podium, in addition to the Saudi and American flags.

The event started with the Quran and was followed by the Saudi anthem and the American anthem, as a way to pay respect to the U.S. said Abdulaziz Aljamaan, the president of the Saudi Student Association.

Eleazar Xa, a senior international student from China majoring in senior marketing, came to learn about Islam and he particularly liked the traditional clothing styles.

Omar Alshahrani held a 10-minute presentation about the country’s history from past to present. Alshahrani also talked about the country’s economy and education.

Salaman Alshehri, a CSUN business major, performed traditional music.

The Saudi government supported the event by giving the Saudi Student Association $4,000, according to Hamad Almujibah, former president of the Saudi Student Association.

Three different dances were performed at the event, one of them being the original version of Ardah. The dance, Ardah, varies from one area to another, but we decided to show the one the royals prefer, said Almujibah.

There was a small exhibition featuring images of traditional clothing, holy buildings and nature photography by Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission, as a way of giving students an image of the country.

Students were able to try out local clothing, taste local food and get a henna tattoo by tattooist Shempi Kaur.

“(Henna tattoos are) an Indian traditional wedding custom,” said Kaur, a volunteer.

Faisal alZamil, a freshman majoring in manufacturing system engineering, thought it was a great way to gather Saudi students and to see their talents. The music was what he enjoyed the most.

Hosam Mirza, a freshman engineering management major at CSUN wanted to meet other Saudi students.

“This is maybe the only event where Saudi people have a chance to meet each other,” Mirza said.

 

CSUN students see professional comedians in action at Laugh Your Class Off

Headlining comedian, Jason Collings, performed at CSUN’s Laugh Your Class Off at the USU Games Room on Friday, which will be a monthly event. Photo credit: Anna Ayvazyan / Contributor

CSUN students attended Laugh Your Class Off Friday to watch professional comedians.

“These events bring all the students together and socialize,” said Ashley Du, USU games room commercial service attendant.

Laugh Your Class Off is held an event held every semester where stand-up comedians come to CSUN to make students laugh. The USU hosts this event on the last Friday of every month at the USU Games Room as a way for students to enjoy themselves and to have a good time.

Andy Kwong, sophomore film major, attended the event hoping to get some laughs.

“I want to see if Northridge has any good laughs,” Kwong said.

The USU Games Room filled up with approximately 80 people for the event, according to Victor Molina, USU games room commercial attendant. They waited in line for free pizza before taking a seat for the performance.

Nelson Ventress, the host of the show, introduced the comedians that included Jared Levin, Zoltan Kaszas, Jason Collings and guest David Dorward.

Kaszas has been trying to put together a college tour and CSUN was one of the schools that said yes to him.

“I enjoy very much doing what I do, mostly because I suck at everything else,” Kaszas said.

Kaszas would like to come back next month to perform again for CSUN students.

“I’d like to come back,” Kaszas said. “Cancel the other comedians and I’ll definitely come back.”

This was a good turnout for the first performance of the semester, according to Molina.

“We are hoping by the time the next (Laugh Your Class Off) comes around there will be more people, at least around the hundreds,” Molina said.

 

CSUN alumni serenade students and guests at the USU’s first ‘Soulful Saturdays’ of the semester

CSUN alumna Jessica Samiere, 24, performed cover and original songs at the USU’s first Soulful Saturdays event on Saturday. Samiere recently released her mixtape, “Paint It Pink.” The event was free for students and $5 for non-students. The weekly event features local musicians chosen by the event planning staff and will vary in genre each week. Photo credit: Christina Cocca / Daily Sundial

>>CORRECTION: Soulful Saturdays is a monthly event, not weekly as stated in the article.

Singers and CSUN alumni Jessica Samiere and Angelica Abrams performed a collection of songs for students and guests, earning cheers and applause from the seat-filled Pub Sports Grill at the USU’s first “Soulful Saturdays” event of the semester on Sept. 29.

The event was free for students and $5 for non-students. The weekly event features local musicians chosen by the event planning staff and will vary in genre each week, according to event planner Quinesha Summerville, 21.

Summerville, a senior theater major, said the event is a safe and affordable option for students.

“Soulful Saturdays is a night out for students, and it’s something safe and cost-effective with free music and free food,” said Summerville, theater major.

Some of the future themes include jazz, indie rock and alternative, country and Latin.

Samiere, 24, was the first to perform and attended a Soulful Saturday event last year. Now a CSUN alumna who graduated in 2011 in sociology, Samiere recently released a mixtape called “Paint It Pink” and said she is working on other musical projects.

Emmanuel Martinez, a senior English major who works for the USU events department, helped set up the event. Martinez went to Soulful Saturdays as a student before he worked in planning at the USU, and said he is glad he can still attend the event after set-up to see his hard work pay off.

“It’s just a feel good event for students to come enjoy on a Saturday night as opposed to going somewhere far and spending money,” said Martinez, 22. “It brings the students back to campus on a weekend and helps them relax and enjoy really good music by really good performers who are usually CSUN students.”

Abrams, 23, ended the R&B-themed evening with a mix of cover songs and original music. Abrams, who graduated from CSUN in 2011 in music industry studies, said she used to frequent the Pub in her days as a student and felt nostalgic when coming to perform.

“I actually played in the Pub as a student two or three years ago,” Abrams said. “It’s fun to be here not as a student and playing again for my friends and CSUN students.”

Abrams released her new single, “Do I Love You,” in London on Sept. 30.

Tabitha Sanchez, a freshman communications major, heard about the event on her portal and said she enjoyed herself and the performers.

“The Soulful Saturday event really drew me in because I like to get involved and see what’s in store on campus,” said Sanchez, 18. “Of course, they have a free meal, and you can’t miss out on that!”

Information on Soulful Saturdays can be found on USU’s Facebook page, events calendar or the USU home page.

Saudi National Day at the Grand Salon

Story by Terese Torgersen

The Saudi Student Association celebrated Saudi Arabian National Day at the USU Grand Salon on Friday and featured traditional food, clothing, music and dance.

The Grand Salon was decorated in green and white, the colors of the Saudi Arabian flag. The men wore thobs, which are traditional Saudi Arabian clothing. A picture of King Abduliziz and the crown prince Salman was featured at the podium, in addition to the Saudi and American flags.

The event started with the Quran and was followed by the Saudi anthem and the American anthem, as a way to pay respect to the U.S. said Abdulaziz Aljamaan, the president of the Saudi Student Association.

To read more click here.

 

Laugh Your Class Off!

CSUN students attended Laugh Your Class Off Friday to watch professional comedians.

“These events bring all the students together and socialize,” said Ashley Du, USU games room commercial service attendant.

Laugh Your Class Off is held an event held every semester where stand-up comedians come to CSUN to make students laugh. The USU hosts this event on the last Friday of every month at the USU Games Room as a way for students to enjoy themselves and to have a good time.

To read more click here.

 

Students use performance art to raise awareness of smoking related diseases and deaths

David Coker, a junior majoring in Communications, was one of 20 students in Comm 401 taking part in an assignment advocating for social change. Outside Manzanita Hall they drew chalk outlines around students in the class to represent the loss of life that occurs every eight seconds from tobacco use. Victoria Kleiman, the student organizer from the class said, “Our first assignment was just to pick a topic that we’re passionate about. Everyday I come to school and I see countless students walking by smoking cigarettes and we thought what better than right outside our own building. So it’s something that hits home.” Photo credit: Nathan McMahon / Daily Sundial

Men’s Soccer: Matadors lengthen win streak to five

In their first Big West Conference game of the season, the Matadors (7-3) defeated UC Davis  (2-4-4) 2-0 at home capping off a five-game winning streak with three straight shutouts.

CSUN senior midfielder Rene Anguiano battles a UC Davis defender in Friday’s Big West 2-0 home opening win. Photo credit: Loren Townsley / Photo Editor

Freshman midfielder David Turcios scored his first career goal in the seventh minute of the first half while sophomore forward Edwin Rivas scored CSUN’s second goal, his sixth of the season, just minutes later.

Senior goalkeeper Michael Abalos made two key saves, contributing to Northridge’s defense which has held opponents scoreless four out of the last five games. The Matadors’ defensive prowess frustrated the Aggies, which lead to a red card when defender Ethan Shawlee was ejected for a hard foul away from the ball around the 46th minute in the second half.

According to Trucios, the red card ignited UC Davis because they had nothing to lose.

Plenty of fouls were called between Matadors (21) and UC Davis (18), which resulted in a couple of injuries, two players from UC Davis were injured in the first half and the team was left with just 10 players on the field.

UC Davis Goalkeeper Omar Zeenni made five saves to prevent the Matadors from scoring in the second half.

After the game, head coach Terry Davila discussed the highs and lows for their first Big West Conference game.

Davila said the team came out strong but fouled too much and also thought the red card gave UC Davis motivation to play harder.

“In the second half, we came out unorganized in the midfield,” said Davila about the difference between the two halves.

Davila was confident about the team’s defense being their strength coming into the season. He credited the seniors and their leadership as part of the success.

“The players are older and experienced. They’ve added depth,” Davila said. “It wasn’t a pretty win but still a win.”

Rivas said the team was able to win because they stuck to the game plan and stayed consistent even during the scoreless second half.

“We’re all together. It’s either all of us or none of us,” Rivas said.

According to Rivas, the team needs to score early and keep going at their opponent in the next game.

“We need to stay organized for 90 minutes,” Rivas said.

Turcios said they practiced the play he scored on multiple times and took the opportunity to execute it when the time arrived.

“It would’ve been a different game had they scored first,” Turcios said.  “It doesn’t matter who the opponent is, we must stick to the game plan.”

The Matadors will face Big West newcomer Sacramento State at home on Sunday.

 

 

Women’s Volleyball: CSUN stifles last year’s Big West champions

Junior outside hitter Mahina Haina gets up to put the ball over the net against the visiting Big West champs. Photo credit: Jacqueline Kalisch / Daily Sundial

Freshman outside hitter/middle blocker Cieana Stinson made an impressive introduction in front of the Matadome faithful Thursday night as she helped lead CSUN to a four-set victory over rival Long Beach State.

Stinson had a game-high 18 kills, two blocks and three block assists over the defending conference champs.

“I just appreciate the opportunity I have to play,” Stinson said.  “I’m happy I get to play on the court as a freshman and I just take it to heart.  My position could be taken at any time, so I just try hard and do the best I can for my team.”

Head coach Jeff Stork was complimentary of his team’s performance, especially that of Stinson.

“She has a very live arm, most of it from the right side which is off of one foot, which is her strength,” Stork said..  “We try to put her in that situation and she was very successful tonight.”

Defensive stops at the net were a key point in the game. Capped by sophomore middle blocker Sam Kaul and Stinson stifling a 49er attack to win the game for Northridge.  Sophomore middle blocker Casey Hinger led the defensive effort on the front row with eight block assists and eight kills.

“Two of my really good friends are the middles for Long Beach, so it was extremely important for me to block them,” Hinger said.  “We watch video on them, we scout them really well and we know how they hit.”

CSUN has won four of the last five matches from their southern rival in the Matadome.

Sophomore outside hitter Mahina Haina made a thunderous kill from the back row to put CSUN up 12-9 in the first set, forcing Long Beach to call a timeout.  Haina finished the game with 13 kills and eight digs.

Later in the set, the 49ers went on a 7-1 run to a 16-13 lead.  CSUN blocking up front by Stinson and Hinger helped the Matadors to close the gap and tie it up, but late defensive miscues cost the Matadors the first set, 25-23.

In the second set, sophomore outside hitter Britney Graff served a floating, high-arcing serve that then dropped like an anvil to get the Matadors up 6-2.  Graff finished the night with nine kills, eight digs and three service aces.

Stinson kept the momentum going with two booming kills over Long Beach star Delainey Aigner-Swesey to give the Matadors a 12-8 lead.  Aigner-Swesey led the 49ers with 14 kills, seven digs and three block assists.

A Matador defensive error almost had Long Beach’s Chisom Okpala with a free kill, but Okpala netted to give CSUN a 19-14 lead.

Stinson lined a kill down the sideline to win the second set for the Matadors, 25-19.

Midway through the third set, Stinson tried to jumpstart the CSUN offense with a powerful kill, closing the deficit to 12-13.  Shortly after, the call was reversed, giving the 49ers the ball and causing the crowd to yell “Replacement refs!”

Graff hammered the ball through the 49er defense to even the score and amend the call.

Kaul and Stinson stuffed the kill to lead the Matadors to a 25-17 win in the third set, a feat they would repeat at the close of the decisive fourth set.

“Our block was outstanding tonight,” Stork said.

Junior setter Sydney Gedryn and Kaul kept the momentum of the match in CSUN’s favor when they roofed Okpala to keep a two-point cushion and Haina hit another kill off the block to extend the lead to three and forcing a 49er timeout at 8-5.

After a long rally, Stinson found another hole in the defense to keep a three-point lead for CSUN.

Long Beach went on a 2-0 run after a Graff cross-court kill until the 49ers were called for a netting penalty.  Long Beach head coach Brian Gimmillaro and two players argued with the ref, causing the Matadome faithul to yell “Sit down coach!”

Stinson put a kill into the 49er backcourt to break a 17-17 tie.  Subsequently, CSUN went on a 2-0 run, but Long Beach soon closed the gap and tied the game at 20.

Again, Stinson broke the tie with a kill, this time off a 49er defender.  A Long Beach error gave the Matadors an extra point and a 22-20 lead.

Hinger thought the team’s growth has shown in their play against top conference powers.

“We’ve grown so much since last year,” Hinger said.  “I don’t think anyone in our conference really took it seriously until they saw the Hawaii game and saw that we were capable of beating a great team and we just proved it tonight by beating another great team.”

The Matadors next host the UC Irvine Anteaters Saturday night before going on a three-game road trip.