A look back at the most controversial editorials

When I took the opinions editor position the campus community was faced with the impacts of the university’s budget cuts and frustrating economic recession. Disappointingly, campus life and the student body expressed little to no concern on these issues, helping the word “apathy” define the student’s reaction. This past semester as the anger and frustrations grew the faculty and students began to emerge from the classrooms and their apathetic slumber to express themselves through the freedoms of speech, assembly and protest.

As the opinions editor I tried to confront the past year’s controversial issues through the Daily Sundial and welcome the student body and faculty to express their opinions on these topics. The Sundial became an outlet for discussion and expression as the website received far more comments than any other semester. From the “Greek society’s philanthropy apathy,” Prop 8 and the recent immigration law passed in Arizona, the campus community voiced and exercised their freedoms on these dividing topics.

In the final issue of the Sundial we take a look back at the most controversial and engaging editorials that ran during the 2009-10 academic year.
Never lose sight of your freedoms and the time you have at the university to express them. The campus newspaper is one of the greatest ways to express yourself and make a difference. When you disagree with an opinion, decision or action, feel compelled and empowered to challenge them. Engage and express.
Congratulations, graduates. And good luck to all students, faculty and administration with your future endeavors.

Sincerely,

William Herbe
Opinions editor

The Greek society’s philanthropy apathy February 24, 2010

Sororities and fraternities represent a prominent group of people at CSUN, and through their philanthropies, they have helped various different charities better the world.

There are so many different Greek organizations to choose from, that it must be a mind-boggling experience to pick only one to rush.

Thoughts on H8 April 20, 2010

I do not support same-sex marriage. This may come as quite a shock to CSUN students, many of who are likely unaware that a real live traditionalist walks among them. I am concerned that the bulk of the arguments you have heard in opposition to same-sex marriage are made in the context of religious conviction. I understand why irreligious people may be unconvinced by theological reasoning.