Getting invovled on campus to make the most out of the semester

Photo credit: Natalia Bereznyuk, Staff Photographer

There are about 300 clubs and organizations on CSUN’s campus, enough to fit anyone’s major or hobby interest.

There are many ways to get involved on campus such as becoming a volunteer, joining a club or organization, or becoming a member of a fraternity or sorority. The dorms also offer opportunities to get involved; the list goes on.

The clubs and organizations are broken up in to about eight categories: fraternities and sororities, special interest, religious, honor society, college based, cultural, university program, and recreation/sports club.

CSUN has enabled students who are not able to play in certain university-level sports to still enjoy playing basketball, volleyball, and flag football through intramurals. Sororities, fraternities, clubs and anyone who wants to start a team can join.

Timothy Collins, intramurals volunteer coordinator, said that intramurals are perfect for everyone, no matter what type of skill level they have.

“I believe intramurals leave out the stress, but keep the sportsmanship and competitive play without leaving out the basic joy of play,” Collins said.

There are ways to get involved on campus to help others and the community as well. CSUN’s Residents Hall Association (RHA) is committed to helping the university’s residential communities have a healthy, inclusive and exciting living environment, according to their mission statement.

Joining the RHA is not limited to residents only; anyone can come and help with the community.
RHA president Amari Canada believes the primary benefit of joining RHA is serving the community. Canada says if there is anything wrong, RHA will help to fix it.

“This is an opportunity to get your voice heard. It is also a great networking opportunity, and to get a chance to be a part of a well-known organization,” Canada said.

Benefits of RHA membership include priority registration, leadership conferences and other growth opportunities.

Canada believes it is important to get involved, make an impact, and help make resources for others along the way.

There are many ways to make an impact on CSUN’s campus. One way is becoming a volunteer. The volunteer program, Unified We Serve, has conducted events such as “Survive the Night,” during which students camped out in front of the Oviatt Library to experience how it feels to be homeless. They have also hosted a campus clothing and food drive, during which they filled nearly the entire steps of the Oviatt Library with donated items.

This program follows a theme every year. Last year’s theme was  poverty and this year is health and well-being.
Justin Weiss, coordinator for Unified We Serve, said there are no requirements for the volunteer program except for the willingness to help others.

For example, the program hosts an event where a student can adopt a family who can’t afford a Thanksgiving meal and provide them with a holiday dinner.

“For incoming freshmen it’s best if you balance your time,” Weiss said. “The focus should be on school, but the volunteer program is good because there’s not too much commitment.”

CSUN also gives students the opportunity to start their own clubs. The requirements include a minimum of five members and approval by the Matador Involvement Center.

Studies have shown that students who are involved are most likely to stay in school and graduate.