Friday news wrap-up

night shamu show at sea world san diego
During a night performance at Shamu Stadium, trainers direct killer whales on March 20, 2014 at SeaWorld San Diego. (Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times/TNS/MCT)

Local

A female motorist, suspected of driving under the influence, has been arrested in South Los Angeles on Wednesday. The suspect, driving a red Honda Accord, was taken into custody at the intersection of Imperial and Willowbrook around 11 p.m. after a 30-minute chase. According to the article, LAPD officers used a spike strip to stop the vehicle close to the intersection of Imperial and Compton. The driver lost control of her car and hit a curb, giving officers a chance to apprehend the woman.

(Credit to KTLA)

State

The state of California has banned the imprisonment of orcas and captivity programs, such as the one previously run by SeaWorld, after Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation on Tuesday. The bill prevents California attractions from featuring orcas for entertainment, and starting in June 2017, these mammals in captivity can only be used for “educational presentations.” The new law, presented by Assemblyman Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) says that research and rehabilitation centers can still hold orcas for scientific and educational purposes.

(Credit to LA Times)

National

The United States presidential election remains contentious, as Republican nominee Donald Trump caught up to Hillary Clinton in a national poll published Thursday. Clinton, the Democratic nominee, holds a two-point lead over Trump (46%-44%). Trump also leads with men (50%-39%) and white voters (51%-40%), while his opponent leads with women (52%-39%).

(Credit to USA Today)

Sports

New York Knicks guard Derrick Rose claims he did not understand the meaning of consent after he and his two friends were named in a civil lawsuit against plaintiff Jane Doe. Rose and his two friends are accused of rape by Doe. Waukeen McCoy and Brandon Anand, Rose’s attorneys, made the claim in a 90-minute teleconference. Doe has asked for anonymity throughout the trial, which will begin on Oct. 4.

(Credit to USA Today)