Chabad to hold event celebrating kindness

Megan McFadden

On the sixth anniversary of the national tragedy that was 9/11, Chabad at CSUN will host an event to offer students the opportunity to do good deeds.

“It’s a really great time to give back on a day so much bad has happened to this country,” said Kimberly Erieg, a student on the Chabad CSUN Board of Directors.

The 9/11 Mitzvah Marathon will be held today from 9:11 a.m. to 3:11 p.m. on the lawn outside the Matador Bookstore for all students who “feel the need to give back.”

The American Red Cross will be on campus for those students who would like to donate blood. Students can also donate to charities or donate school supplies to homeless children.

Other ways to give back during this day is to say a prayer, call a grandparent, tell someone how much they’re loved, or send a friend a New Year card. The Jewish New Year, or Rosh Hashanah, begins Wednesday at midnight. Cookies and “I Did a Mitzvah” stickers will be given to students who participate.

“I think it’s a good way to bring people together to do something nice. I like the idea of having a community get together,” said 22-old Corey Stanley, graphic design major,

All students are welcome to the Mitzvah Marathon, which will feature a “Wall of Goodness and Kindness,” where each deed pledged for the day will be displayed with the deed written on one side and a picture of a victim of terrorism on the other.

Erieg said she would like the whole campus to participate.

“We found students wanted to do something,” she said.

About 10 students currently have appointments to donate blood, said Erica Feinman, a sociology major also on the Chabad CSUN Board of Directors. But they expect many more to participate, she said.

A mitzvah traditionally was the following of commandments in the Torah, but now describes an act of kindness or worthy deed, said Rabbi Chaim Brook, the rabbi for the CSUN Chabad House.

Following the tradition of giving sweet cakes at Rosh Hashanah to wish a sweet new year, students can donate to Chabad by buying sweet cakes, which will be delivered to senior citizens in the local community.

Brook said “the Mitzvah Marathon is for everyone who wants to put goodness into this world. In times of extreme darkness, you can’t push it away. You need to bring in light.”

“The point is to do good deeds all the time,” Feinman said. “This is a great way to remind people to take the time and help others.”

Chabad is a national Jewish student organization on 20 campuses that serves Jewish students and communities.

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