Fair promotes campus services

Mercedes Aguilar

The UMATTERDOR fair was held on Matador Square on March 6. The Student Affairs sponsored event was held for the second semester.

“I’m excited to provide information on all the services that students aren’t aware,” said Wendy Phelps, UMATTERDOR Fair planning committee coordinator.

The tent had about 18 to 20 booths ranging from the student health center to the Department of Public Safety.

Last semester the event was created with booths along a walkway by the Matador Square, said Phelps. But this semester the committee decided on the booths being under a big-top tent, she said.

The university provides different services that are free or are at low-cost, said Phelps.

Students don’t know that the health center offers chiropractic services for $10, she said.

Claudia Alvarado, graduate student of Kinesiology, said she would have participated if she had known about all the services CSUN has.

Students had to obtained a UMATTERDOR Passport which contained the list of all the programs and services, then each booth presenter would give a student a sticker once they received information, said Tonee Sherrill, a volunteer from the University Student Union.

The students only needed to collect a minimum of five stickers to receive free food and a chance to enter a raffle, Sherrill said.

The raffle was called every hour and participants won T-shirt or gift cards.

The health center gave free five-minute massages at their booth, to attract attendees.

Emily Vidal, a drawing and painting major, was one of the students that received a free massage by Sibley.

“It looked good and I need to relax,” Vidal said about signing up for the massage.

Massage therapy is one of the popular programs from the health center, which has a month’s waiting list, said Klotz Student Health Center massage therapist Nicole Sibley.

The USU also had other giveaways. In a spin the wheel game students won tote bags, backpacks, or events calendars.

“You won a spring calendar, all events are free”, said Dan Monteleone, Chair of the Personnel Committee of USU, to a student that had landed on calendar spot on the wheel.

The Department of Public Safety also had a drunk driving simulation set up.

Student put on ‘drunk goggles,’ which produced blurry vision, said Dan Foster, Crime Prevention Coordinator for the Department of Public Safety.

“I never thought you would walk so crooked when you’re drunk,” said Juan Maldonado, a sophomore and sociology major, after he had completed the simulation.

Maldonado had to walk in a straight line, but instead walked in a diagonal line after he put on the goggles.

Foster said, public safety has a lot of programs students don’t know about, such as the Rape Aggression Defense System, which allows women to learn self-defense tactics and techniques, or the Security Tracking of Office Property for laptops, which increases the chances of laptops being returned to the rightful owner after they are stolen.

Project Date, a program that brings awareness to date rape, put together a jeopardy style game, called Test Your Knowledge. The game was filled with myths and facts about date rape, said Brian Ly, a junior business management major.

Phelps said she was planning for 1,200 to 1,500 students to attend. Last semester an estimated 1,000 to 1,200 students showed up, she said.

More than 100 volunteers from 18 different departments on campus made the event possible, said Phelps.