Activists revive Student of Color Coalition

Student+of+Color+Coalition+members+%28from+left+to+right%29+Lily+Gonzalez%2C+Rocio+Rivera%2C+Fernando+Lopez-Gonzalez%2C+Diego+Paniagua+and+Lupe+Granados+meet+to+discuss+the+SCC%E2%80%99s+interests.+Photo+credit%3A+Romona+Kivett
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Activists revive Student of Color Coalition

Student of Color Coalition members (from left to right) Lily Gonzalez, Rocio Rivera, Fernando Lopez-Gonzalez, Diego Paniagua and Lupe Granados meet to discuss the SCC’s interests. Photo credit: Romona Kivett

Student of Color Coalition members (from left to right) Lily Gonzalez, Rocio Rivera, Fernando Lopez-Gonzalez, Diego Paniagua and Lupe Granados meet to discuss the SCC’s interests. Photo credit: Romona Kivett

Student of Color Coalition members (from left to right) Lily Gonzalez, Rocio Rivera, Fernando Lopez-Gonzalez, Diego Paniagua and Lupe Granados meet to discuss the SCC’s interests. Photo credit: Romona Kivett

Student of Color Coalition members (from left to right) Lily Gonzalez, Rocio Rivera, Fernando Lopez-Gonzalez, Diego Paniagua and Lupe Granados meet to discuss the SCC’s interests. Photo credit: Romona Kivett

Perla Colin

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A collection of CSUN club representatives, activists and students came together at the Glenn Omatsu House last Wednesday to revive CSUN’s Student of Color Coalition and create an agenda for their collective campus objectives going forward.

The SCC is looking to organize their collective members and those interested in joining to address a series of racial injustices students of color face while receiving an education at CSUN and create a lasting chapter of representation after the current members graduate.

The union so far includes members of CSUN’s Revolutionary Scholars, Asian American Studies Pathways Project, Black House and the American Indian Student Association.

Revolutionary Scholars organizer, Diego Paniagua, helped facilitate the meeting and establish the spirit behind the SCC.

“The Student of Color Coalition is something that is able to unify the student of color organizations and clubs on campus so we can have a larger voice to discuss issues going on,” said Paniagua.

While the Keep Diversity in our University movement — composed of students and faculty against the implementation of Executive Orders 1100-R and 1110 — remains in full effect, the SCC intends to address other key issues in addition to the executive orders.

Following two accounts of assault that occurred on campus last semester, one of the main issues the SCC plans to tackle is student safety on campus.

Another Revolutionary Scholars organizer, Rocio Rivera, said that conversations with CSUN administration need to take place in order to find out what measures are being taken to prevent another assault from happening again.

“How is administration combating these societal issues that are so deeply ingrained that they have been normalized?” said Rivera. “(The assaults) really shook me to my core. I don’t even feel safe on my own campus.”

When it comes to administrative measures and decisions, SCC expects the administration to be transparent as well as provide a safe space for students of color to hold conversations and demonstrations regarding social justice issues.

In order to make this happen, the SCC invites students and members of ethnic organizations and clubs to attend future meetings and events and help them create a safe, open and equal space for all students of color to voice their unique needs and concerns.

“The Student of Color Coalition has always been open to any student organization that wanted to address student of color issues or had a mission within their organization to bring light on marginalized communities,” said Paniagua.

Any student who’s interested in knowing more about the SCC can email the group at csunstudentsofcolorcoalition@gmail.com or visit the Instagram page for their efforts organizing against EO 1100-R and 1110.