Spitz, nothing to spit at

Lilianna Oustinovskaya

The name might sound strange but the food at Spitz Little Tokyo will appeal to most. The new location in Little Tokyo, joining the wildly successful Spitz Eagle Rock, is a welcomed addition to downtown Los Angeles.

Located in the heart of Little Tokyo, Spitz offers a varied Middle Eastern inspired menu, including doner kebabs, a sandwich made from minced meat, wraps, salads, and an assortment of delectable side dishes- not to mention’ its award-winning gelato, voted ‘best ice cream in the universe,’ by TIME magazine.

What sets Spitz’s doner kebabs apart is that the meat is cut into thin strips, modeled after the kebabs served in cafes in Spain. According to the Spitz Web site, it was there that one of the co-founders, Bryce Rademan, first became introduced to the doner kebab. When Rademan returned to the United States, he decided to team up with his friend Robert Wicklund to create the restaurant. That’s the story of how Spitz came on the Los Angeles culinary scene.

More importantly however, are the menu’s items. The fried pita strips, served with hummus, make for a wonderful appetizer to share with friends.’ The classic chicken doner is served on a choice of lavash or focaccia bread. The thinly-sliced chicken is served with fresh lettuce, tomatoes, cucumber, chili sauce and Spitz’s famous Tzatziki sauce. The flavors blend together wonderfully and are surprisingly balanced between spicy and cool.

Side dishes include the popular crispy sweet potato fries. The seasoned thinly-cut French fries aren’t greasy and have the right amount of crunch to them. For those who are more health conscious, Spitz offers large portions of its fresh salad, served on a bed of romaine lettuce with feta cheese, tomatoes, olives and onions.

Most of the meals at Spitz are around $10, which makes this caf’eacute; one of the few affordable and delicious options.

A great accompaniment to your meal is the extensive selection of different wines and beers at the bar.

There is no table service, instead you order your food at the counter and seat yourself.
Another reason Spitz has garnered a cult following among a certain set of young hipsters is because it sells freshly brewed coffee and iced tea from the trendy boutique coffee shop LAMILL.

During peak business hours, Spitz is overflowing with people. The restaurant attracts a varied group of clients. During the day you can see corporate business suits, young college students and tourists enjoying the delicious food.

The European inspired industrial d’eacute;cor and the intimate seating arrangement allow for easy conversation. At night, the outside patio is full of people. The relaxed atmosphere and the unpretentious decorations and menu items have helped Spitz carve out a niche on the Los Angeles scene.

Unfortunately, the parking situation at Spitz is typical of the downtown Los Angeles area. Street parking is limited and extremely difficult to find. There are, however, parking lots throughout the area, most offering a flat daily rate of about $5.

Whether you are grabbing food on the go or eating out with a large group of friends, Spitz is the perfect place to enjoy good food at reasonable prices. Spitz is also within walking distance of retail shops such as American Apparel, making it a great way to spend the day.

While Spitz Little Tokyo is located far from CSUN, the delicious food and relaxed atmosphere make this caf’eacute; worth the drive.

Spitz Little Tokyo
371 E. 2nd St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Hours:
11 a.m. ‘- Midnight
7 days a week