Vinyl records now at the CSUN store

girl in grey shirt looking at records
"I was just curious and I just saw them and it just caught my attention," said Ana Cruz, 18, Sociology major. Photo credit: Brandon Ilano

In a world full of smartphones, music apps and similar technologies, there is constant evolving into newer and better forms of listening to music. However, vinyls and turntables are making a comeback and are being sold at the CSUN campus store.

The store sells a wide selection of vinyl records that is largely displayed alongside turntables. Vinyl albums by artists such as 2Pac, Dr.Dre, Beastie Boys, The Beatles, Michael Jackson and Cage the Elephant can be found in stock. The albums price range is anywhere from $12.98 to $29.98.

“I think it’s cool and if I had a record player I would definitely get a record for it,” said microbiology major, Estefany Rodriguez.

Though the vinyl albums have the classic and traditional look and use as it always has, the turntables are slightly different.

The turntables have a more modern feel that attracts the current generation. The store sells the $69.99 Portable Victrola Suitcase Turntable Record Player in the colors black, red and turquoise. What is different about this turntable, as opposed to what are traditionally used to, is that it has a more technologically based features. This particular record player comes with Bluetooth and is able to wirelessly stream music up to 33 feet away with its built in speakers.

The CSUN Campus Store Director, Amy Berger, said they have been carrying the turntables and vinyl albums for about a year now.

“I think some people are surprised to see records and turntables in the campus store, but they have done well enough to continue carrying them,” Berger said.

In case the album one is looking for is not in stock at the store, there is an even wider range that is also sold on the website. Along with shopping for the albums online, the turntables are also available to shop for.

“It’s cool that they are bringing it back, because people don’t really really use it and they are into their technology,” Katherine Cumplido, liberal studies major, said.

Some may say its a “hipster” trend or a form of millennials remaking a classic music player. Though it may seem that way, this is a great way of getting the current generation back into living in the moment and enjoying music in a way that their parents or grandparents once did.