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Anti-Proposition 76 rally set

for Matador Bookstore Lawn

A rally against Proposition 76, one of several initiatives on the Nov. 8 California special election ballot, will be held on the Matador Bookstore Lawn today from 11:45 a.m. – 2 p.m. Students, faculty and staff who are against the proposition will be given a chance to address publicly what they say are the negative consequences of its potential passage. Associated Students Student Productions and Campus Entertainment, the California Faculty Association and two A.S. directors helped coordinate the event, which will feature live music and free food. The initiative also looks to cap state spending and change the amount of money guaranteed to public education. The proposition would also give the California governor the authority to cut funding for state programs midyear if the state is in a fiscal crisis. The booths and tents that are set up will be used to give out information in regards to Proposition 76, said Bryson White, director of political awareness for A.S. Toward the end of the event, there will be political poetry when people can go up and share what comments they have, White said. “There (will) also be an open mic session for people to talk about the proposition and show what the repercussions are if people vote yes on it.” Latin alternative band Locos Por Juana, who is in town for an appearance at the Latin Grammys will perform at the event, which White said should hopefully draw people over to the bookstore area. “What I’m looking forward to the most in this coming event is seeing the whole campus come together against this proposition, and seeing the campus make sure that our voices are heard in helping to make a difference,” he said. “I’m really looking forward to the unity that our community will have (today).”

– Mark Solleza

AISA to show documentary for

Indigenous Awareness Month

The American Indian Student Association and the American Indian Studies Program continues its presentation of the sixth annual Indigenous Awareness Month with the screening of “Snowball Effect,” a documentary by Klee Benally about the Snowbowl Ski Resort development on the San Francisco Peaks, a mountain in Northern Arizona that is held sacred by more than 13 tribal nations. The film, which will screen at 11 a.m. in Jerome Richfield Hall 319, documents how the development would further desecrate the sacred site, increase threats to endangered species and cause environmental destruction, according to the filmmaker. The month’s activities will continue Nov. 8 with two events: The first will welcome Jimi Castillo, spiritual leader of the Gabrielino Tongva Nation, who will be on campus to present information regarding the tribes’ struggles in the Los Angeles area. The event will begin at 4 p.m. in the University Student Union Pasadena Room. At 5 p.m. in the same location, the AISA’s Potluck Gathering will take place, which will primarily be an opportunity for students and members of the community to gain greater awareness of CSUN’s American Indian Studies Program. There will also be a drum group on hand to perform as well as a special recognition award given to Barbara Rhodes of the Pan-African Studies Department for her commitment to education at CSUN.

– Ryan Denham

Student Outreach services keep

‘Ask the Matador’ site going

The Student Outreach and Recruitment Services website will continue to feature its link “Ask the Matador” to attract new CSUN students. Users can type in a question that he or she needs to know, such as how to be admitted into CSUN or what sort of majors are offered, and the website will generate an answer that could best serve the user’s needs. According to Marieanne Quiroz, coordinator of information resources for SORS, the link has been around for about a year. The website was launched last February in an effort to get prospective students interested in CSUN. “Ask the Matador” was sponsored by Hobsons Global Careers and Educations services. “Our department developed and created the answers found in ‘Ask the Matador’ when you type in a question,” she said. “I think it’s great because it allows people to have access to our services 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

– M.S.