Letter to the Editor: It’s time to eat real, America!

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Letter to the Editor: It’s time to eat real, America!

Illustration by: Kristin Hugo / Opinions Editor

Illustration by: Kristin Hugo / Opinions Editor

Illustration by: Kristin Hugo / Opinions Editor

Illustration by: Kristin Hugo / Opinions Editor

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Illustration by: Kristin Hugo / Opinions Editor

What better way to describe the purpose of Food Day than what was voiced by its sponsors, “we want Americans to cook real foods for their families again”.

Over the last thirty years, the American diet has transformed from one that involved the preparation of fresh applesauce by our grandmothers to one that is ordered from fast-food restaurants, highly processed and nutritionally empty. Convenience, instead of wholesomeness, has become our priority in foods.

The American diet, high in calories and poor in nutritional quality, coupled with a sedentary lifestyle, has exponentially increased the rate of obesity in Americans, contributing to innumerable chronic diseases and premature deaths.

Food Day, which takes place on October 24th, is dedicated to bring “real” back into the American diet, and return it to its wholesome and sustainable roots. It is a day where consumers and food producers join each other in celebrating foods that are safe for our health, and that of our farm workers, farm animals, and environment.

The history of Food Day dates back thirty-six years. In 1975, the first three national Food Days took place to raise awareness of food safety and nutritional issues.

Food Day has since contributed to major accomplishments nationwide, including food sodium and trans fat labeling, ban on food sulfite preservatives, funding for food safety inspections, fast food restaurant menu labeling, reduction and ban of soda and junk foods from public schools, and Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative.

This meaningful day is sponsored by the Center for Science in Public Interest (CSPI), a program that has been committed to promoting nutrition, health, and food safety since 1971.

Food Day is not only about food consumption, but also about changing food polices, making people aware of our nation’s food system and how they can become a part of the change process. Food Day brings people together and creates a forum where people can discuss healthy foods and how to access them.

Demonstrate your advocacy of Food Day by requesting congress to support Food Day’s following goals:

  1. Reduce diet-related disease by promoting safe healthy foods
  2. Support sustainable farms and limit subsidies to big agribusiness
  3. Expand access to food and alleviate hunger
  4. Protect the environment and animals by reforming factory farms
  5. Promote health by curbing junk-food marketing to kids
  6. Support fair conditions for food and farm workers

No venue is too small to participate in Food Day activities. In fact, churches, schools, and homes are encouraged to cook healthy meals on National Food Day. Recipes will be included in the Food Day recipe booklet provided by CSPI, free of charge. Visit http://foodday.org/newsroom/releases/food-day-cookbook-release.pdf to find a multitude of recipes. Delicious recipes such as Fennel Apple Soup and Hot and Sour Salmon with greens are available in the booklet.

The booklet is given not only as a tool, but also in hopes of inspiring more people to cook for themselves and their loved ones.

Students can participate by organizing pot lucks encouraging students to bring small dishes made from scratch to share with their peers.

There are a variety of events taking place on October 22-24th.

To learn more about Food Day and how you can celebrate this year’s event, visit: http://www.foodday.org/

 

Sincerely,

California State University Northridge

2011-2012 CSUN/NEVHC

WIC Diatetic Interns

http://www.csun.edu/hhd/fcs/di/