CSUN experience will only make you stronger

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Last week my hip, young mother told me, “You’re all growns up. Now, what are you going to do?” At first this obscure reference to the movie “Swingers” made me chuckle. I thought “My mom is so original.”

Later, I went into my room and blankly stared at the wall. “Seriously, what will I do with my life now that I don’t have the ritual of going to classes everyday?” My mother’s witty yet dreadfully insightful comment struck a chord in my weak heart.

Obviously, attaining a bachelor’s degree in journalism means I should probably plan my life around working low-paying jobs with long hours and competing furiously with other journalists to get the scoop on breaking news.

Who would ask for this kind of torture?

More or less, journalism is based on adrenaline, a desire to get the news to the public, and well, egotism.

Egotism is not a journalistic characteristic I learned from my mentors. However, my colleagues and I quickly learned journalism is about not only disseminating important information, but it is also about getting the story before other competing newspapers.

To my mentors who frown on egotism, I apologize but that’s the nature of the beast.

Now that I am “all growns up” with an ego and a Gov. Schwarzenegger-signed CSUN degree, what will I do, where will I go, who will hire me?

If it was not for CSUN, I would not be prepared for the “real world” and understand the feeling of being rejected, neglected and esteemed.

At CSUN rejection comes in the form of not being added to a class needed to fulfill certain requirements. CSUN rejection is when some professors mistreat students in front a classroom full of his or her peers.

Neglect displays itself as formidable tick – the ultimate show of “We just forgot about you.” Students are neglected when they do not get financial aid on time and their departments fail to send essential documents to Admissions and Records.

Esteem is a welcoming CSUN characteristic. It’s professors and staff who understand and are compassionate about a student’s troubles. That’s esteem.

Never in my life have I met so many inspirational and courageous people as I have at CSUN.

As many times as I have heard about CSUN being the best school in terms of being diverse, little reference is made to several of CSUN’s outstanding professors.

As a senior graduates and reflects on CSUN, some professors stick out of the pack more than others. Some faculty will be missed and others will be eagerly erased from memories.

Throughout my academia at CSUN, I have come to highly regard and admire several professors who have respected my opinions, inspired me to better my work, taught me valuable information not learned from any textbook and pushed me to stand out in the crowd.

Their perseverance for truth and accountability has driven my own ambitions, as well as my fellow peers, to be successful. For this reason, CSUN graduates should tip their caps in honor of professors who have been mentors as well as friends.

So after being rejected, neglected and esteemed by a university many students have called their “second home,” I believe I can take on any challenge.

Whether or not the “real world” is ready for CSUN graduates is another feat one must overcome. Who knows where I will be in five years-time or what type of work I will be doing?

Regardless, CSUN graduates will assure their mothers and fathers not to worry, that their big break will come. I know mine will.

“Que Sera, Sera.” (Whatever will be, will be).

Veronica Rocha can be reached at city@csun.edu.