Majors fair aims to guide students in right direction, make them aware of options

Daily Sundial

CSUN students were given the opportunity to explore majors, minors, organizations, and activities at Majors Fair 2005.

The event, which was organized by the Academic Resource Center/EOP and took place at the University Student Union’s Northridge Center on Wednesday, was expected to bring in at least 500 students.

Another objective of the fair was to allow students to look into campus resources.

“I think it’s important to keep students and faculty working together,” said Shawn Kang, academic advisor at the ARC/EOP.

Currently, there is a large population of CSUN students who are undecided, and many will benefit from an event like this, Kang said.

The important thing is that students take the appropriate steps that are best for them.

At CSUN, there is a unique relationship between students and faculty, which is important in making students feel comfortable, Kang said.

Brian Gurevich, undeclared freshman, said he has no clue what major he wants to declare, and hoped the event would give him some ideas of what he could be interested in.

Gurevich said he hoped to walk away with a better understanding and insight into the available fields, but did not expect to know exactly what he wanted by the time he walked out.

“I think you know about what the majors are, but if you talk to someone in the field, you get a better understanding of what areas are available in that field,” Gurevich said.

German Gallegos, sophomore business major, said he decided his major wasn’t working out for him and was looking into changing it.

When he started taking classes related to business, he realized he wasn’t interested, Gallegos said.

He said he attended the fair hoping to talk to people and get information about other majors, such as sociology, which he is now considering.

Pedro Cesareo, an academic advisor for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, said all students, from freshmen to seniors, could benefit from the event because many times, people who think they know what they want find other areas they would like to explore.

He said it is very common for people to change their majors two or three times throughout college.

Students need direction and information on what is out there, Cesareo said.

Many times, it gets to the point where a student is a junior and it is time to declare a major, but the student is still clueless as to what he or she wants. The fair was an opportunity to give students as much information as possible on what there is and where to go, he said.

“The good thing about doing this is they can come in and ask someone who knows about it,” Cesareo said. “Even if you reach a few, you still make a difference with those few.”