Twenty-year-old millionaire shares business success

Daily Sundial

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Young millionaire Farrah Gray visited CSUN Feb. 25, on behalf of Black History Month, to share with students his experiences and his journey to wealth at such a young age.

Gray’s entrepreneurial journey began at age 6 when he began selling lotion and made his first $50.

With it, he took his mother, who worked three jobs, out to dinner for the first time. Gray recalled that moment as his greatest accomplishment.

By age 9, Gray was carrying business cards and starting economic empowerment groups at school. Gray was given the opportunity to co-host a radio show called “Backstage Live,” which reached 12 million listeners.

Gray had a nationwide speaking career by middle school, with offers up to $10,000 for each appearance.

At age 14, Gray started his own food company targeted to young people, Farr-Out Foods, which he eventually sold for $1.5 million.

Now at age 20, Gray is still involved in numerous projects, including The Farrah Gray Foundation, which helps guide and empower inner city kids. Farrah is also involved in real estate investing, and currently released his first book, “Reallionare: Nine Steps to Becoming Rich From the Inside Out.”

In his speech on Feb. 25, Gray said his success came from stretching his imagination to achieve what people did not expect from him as an African American.

“We don’t lack brain power, we lack the resources,” Gray said

Along with determination and drive, it takes hard work, prayer, a goal and a vision, Gray said.

If you do not have a goal, make it your goal to get one, he said.

“I had to knock on thousands of doors,” Gray said. “No person is successful by themselves.”

Johnie Scott, Pan African Studies professor and a personal friend of Gray, said there have been great speakers in past years, but he felt fortunate to finally have someone speaking who is college-aged and successful.

With people focusing on the negative aspects of youth, Gray serves as an example of a young man who demonstrates potential, Scott said.

“Farrah is rare,” Scott said. “But he shows us life’s possibilities.”

James Golden, president of the Black Student Union, said he felt it was a positive event that had a positive impact on students.

Gray’s ideas about being business-oriented are beneficial no matter what field you are in, Golden said.

“I think people were proud,” Golden said. “That’s why we brought him here.”

Scott said he was excited to see students hanging out afterward to buy a book from Gray. He said it showed that Gray had an impact on people.