Student Housing full, waiting list up to 200

Daily Sundial

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With all bed spaces full and students still on the waiting list for housing, the University Park Apartments should have no problem filling vacancies this semester.

Students in need of housing should not worry, however.

“The waiting list moves quickly,” said Phillip Gin, associate director of business and hospitality for Student Housing and Conference Services. “Historically, we have always been able to accommodate everyone on the waiting list.”

Since many students wait until the last minute to decide whether to live on campus, once their decision is made, bed spaces become available and those on the waiting list are accommodated very early in the process, Gin said.

The UPA maintains approximately 2,150 bed spaces in 15 residence halls, with around 200 students currently on the waiting list, Gin said.

Last fall, changing enrollment policies at the university-level left many vacancies in the UPA and produced a potentially serious revenue problem for Student Housing and Conference Services. In mid-August of last year, Student Housing still had hundreds of vacancies in the UPA.

“Last year, the whole university’s enrollment was low,” said Debbie Quinlan Kolstad, manager of business services for Student Housing. “The tightened enrollment made residency in Student Housing very low.”

Student Housing receives no funds from the university or state. All of their money comes from the fees paid by students living in the dorms, Kolstad said.

“All of our funds go right back to the students in the form of utilities, staff salaries, and basically everything required to run the (Student Housing) Department,” Gin said.

To fill the vacant spaces last year, Student Housing used different methods to get new residents. International students in the Intensive English Program, offered through the College of Extended Learning, were allowed to take up the available spaces, Kolstad said.

One returning student, Ryan Arciaga, senior CTVA major, decided to live on campus to avoid long commutes between Glendale and Northridge.

“It’s very convenient,” Arciaga said. “I don’t have to pay for gas and I like riding my skateboard around campus.”

Students who were interested in living on campus had to fill out the housing application and send in the initial payment of $275 by April 1, then they were guaranteed a bed space.

In addition, new bed spaces have been created for Fall 2005 to meet student demand.

The Center on Disabilities office, which used to occupy space on the first floor of Building 11 of the UPA, has moved to Bayramian Hall, formerly the Student Services Building.

Those rooms are now ready for student use.

Ariana Rodriguez can be reached at ariana.rodriguez@csun.edu.

Ariana Rodriguez can be reached at

“Housing offices, as well, have been consolidated, leaving about 50 more spaces for students,” said Kolstad.

The 2005-06 application for housing is still available and students in need for housing are encouraged to apply.

“When we say our bed spaces are full, it’s not that it’s too late to register,” Kolstad said. “We welcome students throughout the school year.”