Measure B’s success requires porn actors to use condoms

Casey Delich

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






To wrap it or not to wrap it, that was the question LA County voters needed to answer during Tuesday’s elections regarding the use of condoms in pornographic films.

Voters came out in droves Tuesday, and in LA County not only were they voting for their president, but for protection towards adult actors and actresses regarding the use of condoms in movies.

Measure B passed 56 to 44 percent, much to the detriment of many within the pornography industry.

According to the new measure, all pornographic productions within LA County must now apply for a permit from the LA County Department of Public Health in order to shoot a sex scene, and all actors will be required to wear condoms.  All fees collected from the permits will go towards periodic inspections of pornography filming, and those caught violating the new ordinance will be subject to fines and criminal misdemeanor charges.

Measure B will not use any taxpayer money to cover costs for anything related to the adult industry.

The measure was spearheaded by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, citing STD outbreaks as a public health concern.  A study conducted by the American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association said that 168 adult film actors were tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea in 2010, with 47 (28 percent) testing positive for STD’s.

“People should be able to watch what they want in the movies, and as long as they get checked we shouldn’t force it upon them,” said Josef, a junior sociology major, whose last name was withheld.

A 2004 HIV outbreak within the industry and a 2012 syphilis outbreak shut down the industry during a self-imposed 10 day moratorium.

“If they get STD checks, it should be their choice with condoms, but there wasn’t a lot of information out there for voters regarding it,” said Erika, a senior criminology major, whose last name was withheld.

The adult film industry has opposed the measure since it was brought to the ballot, with more than 360,000 signatures, claiming consumers don’t want to buy porn that features condoms.

Not all those in the industry are against the newly passed legislation, with world-famous adult actress Aurora Snow saying that safety may not be sexy, but she knows what the risk is without protection.

“I voted yes, because visually it can set a standard for teens that are watching it, they will learn by watching what they do in the movies,” said Leopoldo, a junior family consumer sciences major, whose last name was withheld.  “You don’t want them to see it without protection because they might copy what they see, thinking condoms aren’t necessary.”

Wicked Pictures, the second biggest company behind Vivid Entertainment, is the only company that requires condoms on all shoots, having done so for many years.

“A lot of people in the industry feel that condoms drive away consumers but we haven’t noticed a problem because of our condom policy,” said Wicked CEO Steven Orenstein in an interview to Jezebel.

A mass exodus of the adult film industry, which claims its “capital” in Chatsworth, CA, is a possibility, noted in a press release by the No on Government Waste Committee, which organized opposition to the measure.

“While the AIDS Healthcare Foundation has tried to portray any move of jobs outside of LA County as unrealistic, the hard truth of the matter is that is exactly what this industry plans on doing now,” said James Lee, communications director of No on Government Waste Committee. “The inevitable consequences of Measure B’s passage and AHF’s short-sightedness will be a significant loss of jobs and tax dollars flowing to local governments to fund police, fire protection and public health services.”

The taking away of the adult industry from its LA county base may cost the local area 10,000 jobs, an industry worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

“The industry is going to stay put.  The law will not take effect until all 85 cities adopt and approve the measure before it becomes a law in that jurisdiction,” said Michael Fattorosi, prominent adult industry lawyer. “Once its adopted they need to figure out an enforcement measure.  We are in a situation of wait and see who is going to adopt it and how.”

In a letter sent to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Wednesday, Free Speech Coalition announced a legal challenge to come for Measure B, according to Adult Video News.

“A legal challenge is definitely warranted,” said Fattorosi.