Business professionals prepare students for future jobs in similar fields at speed mentoring

Pilar De Haro

Dressed in red jumpsuit, Martin Zisner, the Principle System Safety Engineer for "LEIDOS" reminisces about his past jobs and touches on the long list of expertise that he holds in environmental occupatioal health (EOH), environmental management, industrial safety and risk management. The EOH Speed Mentoring event was held at the Northridge Center, USU on Thursday. Photo credit: Pilar De Haro / Contributor

Dressed in red jumpsuit, Martin Zisner, the Principle System Safety Engineer for “LEIDOS” reminisces about his past jobs and touches on the long list of expertise that he holds in environmental occupatioal health (EOH), environmental management, industrial safety and risk management. The EOH Speed Mentoring event was held at the Northridge Center, USU on Thursday. Photo credit: Pilar De Haro / Contributor

In a society driven by social media and the importances of ones online connections, when searching for a job who you know is often more important than what you know. It is because of this fact that the Alumni and Environmental Occupational Health (EOH) Association connected students with professionals in their field at the EOH Speed Mentoring event Thursday night.

The event, held in the USU Northridge Room, gave undergraduate and graduate students the chance to meet with professionals within industries ranging from environmental supervisors to safety representatives and many others. The professionals advised students on what to expect in certain fields and how to prepare for specific positions.

“I came out tonight to get a better idea about what I want to do after finishing school,” said graduate student Tony Vang, 25, and EOH major.  “Events like these help students not only possibly meet future employers but also teach them things to prepare for future interviews and the reality of the work force.”

Jack Hagop Arouchian, Industrial Hygiene consultant, told students that being in a field where the work becomes extensive and tedious will show that it’s not for everybody.

“Graduates and even students coming out their master’s degree programs should not feel entitled to a position in the workforce,” said Arouchian. “You need to put in the hard work and time before feeling this entitlement.”

Students asked questions such as what would it take for professionals present at the event to employ them.

“Don’t lie on your resume because we will figure it out, and get over being shy and ask questions at the interview stage,” said Jennifer Saba, Environmental Health and Safety representative. “Don’t think you’re going to learn everything for the job (right now), you will learn more on the job.”

Students attentively jotted down pointers as she talked about things ranging from the necessity of building up their experience with internships and listened as Saba spoke about her own experience working at Baxter BioScience.

Overall the turnout at the EOH Speed Mentoring event was full of eager students ready to meet professionals in the same field as them.

One professional offered more than words of wisdom.

Laura Drew, California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (CalOSHA) district manager, went from table to table and offered each student an internship opportunity at CalOSHA.