Students share their favorite infused water flavors

Saray+Aparicio%2C+an+undecided+freshman%2C+walks+through+campus+with+cucumber%2C+lemon+and+ginger+infused+water%2C+one+of+her+favorite+combinations+for+the+popular+drink%21+%28The+Sundial%29
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Students share their favorite infused water flavors

Saray Aparicio, an undecided freshman, walks through campus with cucumber, lemon and ginger infused water, one of her favorite combinations for the popular drink! (The Sundial)

Saray Aparicio, an undecided freshman, walks through campus with cucumber, lemon and ginger infused water, one of her favorite combinations for the popular drink! (The Sundial)

Saray Aparicio, an undecided freshman, walks through campus with cucumber, lemon and ginger infused water, one of her favorite combinations for the popular drink! (The Sundial)

Saray Aparicio, an undecided freshman, walks through campus with cucumber, lemon and ginger infused water, one of her favorite combinations for the popular drink! (The Sundial)

Kate Haggard

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Compared to a fizzy soda or tangy fruit juice, water can be a bit bland. But add some vibrant fruits, vegetables and herbs, and you get a healthy drink that looks and tastes good.

Saray Aparicio, an undecided freshman, said she has been drinking infused water for about a year and loves the way it makes her body feel.

“I feel relieved … like I’m awake,” Aparicio said. Her favorite combinations are cucumbers and lemon with ginger, and blackberry with lime.

According to a section on infusedwaters.com, fruit contains natural antioxidants and nutrients that will seep out when added to water, creating an infused drink.

“Honestly, keeping it simple by drinking water … is the best way to keep healthy,” said Dr. Terri Lisagor, a professor in nutrition, dietetics and food services at CSUN.

An article found on the National Institutes of Health website says that caffeine, unlike water, can cause dehydration and a jittery feeling.

“I try to stay away from caffeine,” said Danielle Armstrong, a freshman majoring in journalism. She said that infused water makes her feel healthy, gives her energy, and that it simply tastes better. She said that infused water makes her feel healthy, gives her energy, and that it simply tastes better.

Biology major Salvador Vazquez, whose favorite flavor of infused water is cherry, said he doesn’t choose to have fruit water every day, but when he does it helps him drink more water.

“I drink it in the mornings,” Vazquez said. “On a hot day, it’s refreshing.”

Online, you can find many different combinations of fruit to add to water. Sites such as Allrecipes.com and Pinterest have a variety of recipes to share.

Here are a few recipes that can encourage you to make your own infused water:

Add 3 to 4 ripe, peeled and thinly sliced (or crushed) kiwis to two quarts of water in a glass jar or pitcher. Refrigerate the drink until cold, then take out and enjoy.

If kiwi isn’t your thing, there are more recipes from wellnessmama.com using grapes and oranges. This recipe calls for 2 cups of grapes sliced in half and 1 thinly sliced orange with the rind on. Add the fruit to a gallon of water and refrigerate until cold, then refresh with the fun flavor.

For those interested in herbs, there is a combination of strawberry, basil and cucumber found on shape.com that you might enjoy instead. It calls for 3 chopped basil leaves, 1 sliced strawberry and 3 to 5 slices of cucumber. Like the other recipes, add the ingredients in a large glass or pitcher of cold water and let sit for at least five minutes for the flavor to infuse before drinking.

Instead of sipping on plain water to get through class, try out one of the recipes mentioned or create your own infusion with some favorite fruits or vegetables.