Mental Health Awareness Parade kicks off Beat the BLUES week at CSUN

A+group+of+students+and+peer+educators+from+The+BLUES+Project+marched+throughout+campus+holding+signs+with+positive+messages+to+spread+Mental+Health+Awareness+and+to+kick+off+Beat+the+BLUES+week+at+CSUN.+Photo+Credit%3A+Noemi+Salcedo+
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Mental Health Awareness Parade kicks off Beat the BLUES week at CSUN

A group of students and peer educators from The BLUES Project marched throughout campus holding signs with positive messages to spread Mental Health Awareness and to kick off Beat the BLUES week at CSUN. Photo Credit: Noemi Salcedo

A group of students and peer educators from The BLUES Project marched throughout campus holding signs with positive messages to spread Mental Health Awareness and to kick off Beat the BLUES week at CSUN. Photo Credit: Noemi Salcedo

A group of students and peer educators from The BLUES Project marched throughout campus holding signs with positive messages to spread Mental Health Awareness and to kick off Beat the BLUES week at CSUN. Photo Credit: Noemi Salcedo

A group of students and peer educators from The BLUES Project marched throughout campus holding signs with positive messages to spread Mental Health Awareness and to kick off Beat the BLUES week at CSUN. Photo Credit: Noemi Salcedo

Noemi Salcedo

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A group of students from The BLUES Project held a Mental Health Awareness Parade on campus to kick off Beat the BLUES Week.

With finals coming up, the peer educators of The BLUES Project marched around campus to show fellow CSUN students that their mental health matters and that they are there for support.

Student coordinator of The BLUES Project, Briana Russo, was one of the members marching amongst the crowd.

“The parade means a lot to me. I want people to know who we are, what we stand for, and what we are trying to achieve and accomplish. We want to let them know that even if they might feel alone, they are not,” Russo said.

Many other peer educators, like Fernanda Vera of The BLUES Project, felt that the parade held an important message.

“Just like we go to the doctor to get check-ups for our body and our teeth, I think it is very important to get check-ups for our mental health because a healthy mind and a healthy body just makes the day and life better,” Vera said.

For peer educator Isabel Steffensen, the parade, and week-long event also held a sentimental and personal value.

“I am a SOS (survivor of suicide). When I came to CSUN and learned about The BLUES Project I was filled with a lot of hope because I was like it is finally being talked about.” Steffensen said.

Steffensen also said people grew up in similar situations as herself should not feel ashamed for having certain feelings because she knows what it’s like to be in a dark place.