‘Satellites’ demonstrates racial identitiy and trust

Jacqueline Kalisch

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Courtesy of CSUN Department of Theater

Satellites, a play written by Diana Son puts the lack of racial identity into the culturally diverse New York, showing viewers how racial stereotyping  and declining your identity will get you nowhere.

The play went on for a quick hour and half with no intermission, this went unnoticed, on Oct. 11 at the experimental theater in the  Valley Performing Arts Center.

Nina, played by Tina Choi and Miles, portrayed by Patrick Batiste, are an interracial couple parenting their six-month newborn, Hannah, in their new highly desired Brooklyn brownstone home.

As the play goes on friends, family and strangers appear into their lives, testing their instincts on whom to trust. With non-stop humor slipping into the play, Satellites presents a range of emotional questioning of racial identity, parenting, the community you live in and the way we live our lives.

Nina and her longtime friend and partner, Kit played by Katherine Farber, run their own architect firm in Nina’s home, where as Miles is still desperately searching for a job as an interactive producer in the computer field.

Tina Choi’s performance is easily remembered for her constant frustration and cursing rants. Her realistic interpretation of a struggling mother and the lack of support and love from her husband made her performance the most entertaining to see.

Miles’ brother Eric, portrayed by Rob Cowell, is a traveling, free-spirited “crazy uncle” who is known to be unreliable. Eric asks to live with Nina and Miles right after abruptly entering their home after being robbed.

While Eric brings a more relaxed touch to the set of characters, Mrs. Chae portrayed by Moeko Yamazaki, brings humor to the play,bringing the audience to laughter even for the smallest moments. She is hired as the nanny and her duties include teach Nina and Miles’ baby their roots.

Trust issues arise when Miles’ and Nina’s home is vandalized. Nina and Miles becomes suspicious of their neighborhood and when a man who lives across the street, appears in their house asking for assistance, Miles silently observes him and others throughout the play.

Satellites may not display the soul of New York within its scenery but the play’s message speaks for itself. By combining humor and cultural issues, Satellites reminds us that the biggest messes in life can be restored when you remember to return home.

Satellites continues their show on Oct 12, Fri at 7:30 p.m., Oct 13, Sat at 7:30 p.m. and Oct 14, at Sun 2 p.m. matinee.