CSUN Police Services warns students about bicycle theft

Esmeralda Careaga

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All over campus bicycles are stripped apart by theives. CSUN Police Department advises students to lock their bikes in the provided compounds to prevent theft. Photo credit: John Saringo-Rodriguez / Photo Editor

All over campus bicycles are stripped apart by thieves. CSUN Police Department advises students to lock their bikes in the provided compounds to prevent theft. Photo credit: John Saringo-Rodriguez / Photo Editor

CSUN has experienced several bike thefts this month according to CSUN Police Department (PD).

Between Sept. 3 and Sept. 11 four bikes were reported stolen by PD. The bicycles were stolen from Jacaranda Hall, a student housing University Park Apartment,  the west side of the Student Recreation Center and east side of Sierra Hall.

Police services reported that in all four cases cable locks “secured” the bikes.  They also reported that none of the bikes were registered with CSUN police.

“Since the beginning of the semester eight bikes have been reported stolen,” said Christina Villalobos, CSUN PD public information officer.

Villalobos recommends students lock their bikes safely within the bicycle compounds located on the ground floor of the B3 parking structure, B5 and G3 parking structures, as well as the student housing complex near University Park Apartments 11 and 15.

“The bike compounds are designed for students, and not a single bike has been stolen from the compounds.”

“The Matador Bicycle Compound is safe because students have access,” said Villalobos. “Not everyone can get into the fully enclosed structure. [Even] students have to have a license in order to gain entry, and they must swipe [their license] to go in.”

Police services suggest bicyclists invest in U-locks because they are secure and cannot be cut through.

As an incentive to encourage students to register their bikes, police services have started a drawing.  When students register with the police department and sign up to use the bike compounds, their names are automatically entered into a drawing. Each month the department selects a student winner from the drawings and the winner receives a free U-lock.

Police services purchase the locks for the giveaways with grant money they received from Associated Students.

The B3 bike compounds employs it’s  surveillance camera to ensure bicyclist safety and monitor activity in the area.

Christian Belding, a member of CSUN’s Bike Collective club, said she believes that students need to know how to properly lock up their bikes.

“I use a Bordo Folding Lock, it retails at about $150.  You can break into any lock by using a lock cutter, but having information on how to properly lock up your bike will help decrease theft.”

Dennis D-Alfonso, 26, mechanical engineering major and member of the Bike Collective since 2010, agrees that locks are not the only thing students need to worry about.

“The bicycle racks on campus don’t allow cyclist to properly lock up their bikes,” said D-Alfonso. “A good solution is to better design bike racks and add more to campus,” he said.

CSUN PD will be hosting a safety workshop Thursday Sept. 19 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. at the Department of Police Services Training Room on the second floor.