California Faculty Association reaches tentative agreement for new contract

Alex Vejar

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The California Faculty Association (CFA) reached a tentative agreement for a new three-year contract on Oct. 17.

Members of the CFA will be able to vote on the agreement between Nov. 1 and Nov. 9, according to the CFA website.

The agreement increases salary by 1.6 percent for all faculty, according to the document. Salary will also rise for tenure-track faculty, coaches with at least six years experience, and other types of faculty by three percent — on top of the initial faculty-wide increase.

All salary increases are retroactively effective July 1.

But Kris Kouri, a lecturer at CSUN who teaches in sociology and gender women’s studies, isn’t singing the praises of the new agreement just yet.

“I’m going to have to see how it all works itself out,” Kouri said. “I’m hopeful, but I won’t know until the contract is implemented.”

The California State University (CSU) system also agreed to give $2 million for a “system-wide equity program” for the 2014-15 fiscal year. The money hopes to aid faculty with multiple years of experience that are being paid less than newer teachers, said Lillian Taiz, president of the California Faculty Association.

The increases in pay are only for the 2014-15 fiscal year. Afterwards, negotiations will re-open to iron out the salary structure for the next two fiscal years.

“What we’d like to come out with at the end of three years is a more normal salary structure where people aren’t really suffering as a consequence of not being able to get any kind of salary relief over all these years.”

Taiz said the CFA was in negotiations for 10 months.

“Historically speaking, that is a pretty quick turnaround for us,” Taiz said.

While the CFA and the CSU went for more than 100 days before agreeing on a new contract after the previous one expired, Kouri said the relationship between the faculty and administration is not strained.

“The faculty don’t really have a bad relationship with the school,” Kouri said. “Most of the faculty like the administration. They just feel they have differences of opinion.”

If salary negotiations for years two and three don’t end in an agreement, faculty will be able to strike, Taiz said.

“What we’ve done is to agree that this will be a very serious conversation,” Taiz said. “If there are problems that we can’t agree on, then we’re going to have to duke it out.”

Kouri said the 1.6 percent increase in pay may not be significant enough.

“I’ll take it, but it’s not going to help me that much,” Kouri said. “Anything will help, but that’s very little.”

This story will be updated. Follow Twitter, Facebook and The Sundial online for further updates.