California allows reopening of theme parks, stadiums with restrictions

Theme+parks+and+stadiums+in+California+may+reopen+with+limited+capacity+if+the+county+it+is+based+in+isn%27t+in+the+purple+tier.+The+reopening+could+happen+as+soon+as+April+1.

Glen Scarborough via Flickr

Theme parks and stadiums in California may reopen with limited capacity if the county it is based in isn’t in the purple tier. The reopening could happen as soon as April 1.

Emily Holshouser, Assistant News Editor

On Friday, Gov. Gavin Newsom updated the California COVID-19 Safer At Home blueprint, allowing theme parks, as well as some sports stadiums, to reopen with limited capacity in counties that are in the red tier — the second strictest in the state’s reopening roadmap.

Capacity for theme parks will be limited to 15% in the red tier, 25% in the orange tier and 35% in the yellow tier. Attendance will be limited to California residents. Restaurants/eateries at the theme parks will only have outdoor dining, and only outdoor rides or rides that briefly go indoors will open.

Los Angeles County is currently in the most restrictive purple tier. The county can move into the red tier when the seven-day average of its daily new cases is between 4 and 7 per 100,000 residents for two weeks.

The decision comes as the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic slowly wanes in California. Cases and deaths are decreasing statewide, and intensive care units are no longer at 0% capacity.

L.A. County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer told LAist earlier this week that it was possible to move into the red tier if more vaccinations are administered and if Angelenos continue to be vigilant about following COVID-19 guidelines.

The Department of Public Health released a statement Thursday asking residents to refrain from spring break travel.

“We may just be weeks away from reducing transmission in L.A. County enough so that additional re-openings are permitted,” Ferrer said. “However, with increased case numbers in other states, and more circulating variants of concern, spring travel can lead to another surge that frankly would be almost impossible to tolerate.”

This is a developing story.