Associated Students election voter guide and candidate information

Stephanie Bermudez

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Students will be able to vote online through their CSUN e-mail or in front of the Matador Walk for the Associated Students (A.S.) elections on March 29 and 30 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Dan Monteleone, A.S. director of elections, said A.S. candidates are running for senators of eight of the nine colleges (with the Tseng Extended Learning College being excluded because they do not pay student fees). This includes, Upper Division Senator, Lower Division Senator, Graduate Senator, two seats for At-Large and Presidential and Vice-Presidential positions.

The winners terms begin the day after this semester ends and goes until the last day of Spring 2011, Monteleone said.

According to Monteleone, the election itself is an on-going process.

“While it is biggest during the school year, it’s simply an on-going process that has been going on for decades with different student leaders,” Monteleone said.

In order to run for a position, candidates fill out an application and if they are eligible they are allowed to run. Each student receives a unique, one-time use online ballot, Monteleone said.

Monteleone said he believes winners gain numerous skills during their tenures as senators.

They receive parliamentary training on procedure, character development, and the chance to represent 33,000 students,” Monteleone said.

“I believe that students should vote because it gives them the chance to make a difference,” Monteleone said. “If you don’t vote during the Federal elections, you have no right to complain about how the U.S. President is doing. Similarly, if you do not vote during the A.S. Elections, you have no right to complain about how Associated Students Inc. is being run. It’s up to students to make sure their voices are heard.”

Victor Perez, 24, political science major, said he will be voting for his second year in a row.

“I think it’s cool that the decision is up to us,” Perez said. “I’m going to take advantage of that and I’m going to vote. I hope everyone else can spare a few minutes on that day and vote too.”