Tech Tuesday: ‘Hover-boards’

CSUN+student%2C+Natalie+Cristales%2C+uses+the+new+scooter+around+campus.+Photo+credit%3A+Pilar+De+Haro

CSUN student, Natalie Cristales, uses the new scooter around campus. Photo credit: Pilar De Haro

Pilar De Haro

A new trend has hit CSUN and students are rolling with it.

A new self balancing two-wheeled scooter is being used by students as one of the newest forms of transportation.

According to PhunkeeDucks, a popularized brand for the self balancing two-wheeler scooter, you move back and forth by leaning up and down and turn left and right by pointing slightly downward with either foot.

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A number of students have been spotted using the devices around campus. Photo credit: Pilar De Haro

CSUN student, Natalie Cristales, 20, owner of the viral scooter said she purchased her own online for $500 about a week ago. “It’s been difficult to get used to it but it’s all about finding your balance with it,” said Cristales.

She explains that there are different brands you can find online for competing prices. On Amazon the starting prices are around $300 and range up to $800. Other popularized brands like PhunkeeDucks and IO HAWK are $1,500 and $1,800 from their direct websites.

A long list of celebrities have helped to publicize the now trendy scooter on social media and it made its debut on the Tonight Show this year when Jamie Foxx and Jimmy Fallon tested it out during the show.

Some of the celebrities who helped drive the scooter’s demand are Chris Brown, Kendell Jenner, Justin Bieber, and Whiz Khalifa who most recently was detained at the airport for using it.

Khalifa tweeted last month about the incident, “All because I didn’t want to ditch the technology everyone will be using in the next 6 months. Do what you want kids.” But not all students are thrilled about the latest trend in transportation.

“On the first day of school I saw someone using those new boards, and I literally walked past them..their so slow and expensive,” said Hector Guerrero, 22, BioChemistry Major.

That same student using the viral board took two minutes to reverse, and go over a bump in the library when he could have saved his time by getting off the board and walking, said Guerrero.

In Guerrero’s eyes, popular technology may be changing the way we get from one place to another.