Student Housing Plays a Great Role in College Success

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Student housing at California State University, Northridge, offers different types of board and learning opportunities for a variety of students.

The suites at University Park are designed for freshmen, living away from home for the first time.  The two-person bedrooms, semi-private baths, required meal plans at the main dining room, and shared study lounges are intended to bring first-year students together and introduce them to college life.

The apartments at University Park are suitable for freshmen and returning students.  The two-bedroom, one-bath apartments consist of a living room, dining room, kitchen and private balcony.  Within the apartment living, students have the opportunity to interact with one another as well as maintain their own privacy at a reasonable rate below the market value.

“The rents generally run around 70-75 percent of what one would pay for a comparable apartment in the same area,” said Tim Trevan, director of student housing and conference services.

Students with families are offered one-or two-bedroom apartments at University Village.  These apartments are designed for family living at CSUN.  University Village is on separate grounds from University Park apartments, providing a family environment for students and their dependants.  Residents of University Village enjoy a pool, children’s playground, laundry facilities and recreation room for gatherings.

“Our students with families appreciate that their kids are in an academic environment,” Trevan said.

In addition to various residential alternatives, housing at CSUN extends the opportunity for students of all stages to become involved academically, as well as socially, within the college community by providing activities and programs.
Living Learning Communities (LLCs) and Themed Living Communities (TLCs) offer resident students greater interaction with key faculty and the opportunity to bond with students who share similar abilities and ambitions.

LLCs include engineering and computer science, cinema television arts, freshman year experience, honors, kinesiology, music and lighthouse for deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf studies.

TLCs consist of the Project Passport intended for sophomores and transfer students, and V.O.I.C.E. which reflects cultural education.

LLCs and TLCs allow students to live in halls and floors designated for their communities so their roommates and neighbors share the same major and interest.  Each community offers its own academic support, social activities and events.

“Engaging in student organizations and becoming involved is a key component of the overall college experience,” said Trevan.

Each LLC and TLC is represented by a resident advisor who is a member of the community.  A steering committee made up of students, faculty, and student housing staff is also available to assist with students’ personal and academic development.

“Student housing provides a lot of opportunities as well as social events,” said Amari Canada, a junior journalism major.  “I enjoy the dorms and my roommates.”

CSUN has recently added two buildings to provide living space for 396 students beginning this fall.  The new housing is geared towards first-year students as resident halls will be divided into clusters of 32 students, encouraging a greater sense of community.

A third building will include a recreation room, classroom, multi-purpose room, storage space, office, reception and security desk monitoring all students and guests entering and leaving.

“It is a lot of fun to live in the dorms,” said Jaclyn Balacy, a sophomore music industries studies major.  “We are getting ready for freshmen coming in to live in the dorms in the fall.”


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