California’s propositions on the 2020 ballot

California%27s+propositions+on+the+2020+ballot

Sloane Bozzi and Emily Holshouser

With less than a month until Nov. 3, Election Day is fast approaching. The Daily Sundial has summarized the 12 propositions to serve as a guide — whether you’ll be voting by mail or at a polling station.


Here are the propositions you’ll see on your ballot.

Logan Bik

Prop 14 – Stem Cell Research Bond

A “yes” vote would authorize $5.5 billion in bonds to stem cell research. $1.5 billion would be dedicated to brain diseases.

For Prop 14:

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • The Latino Cancer Institute
  • The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research

Donors in support:

  • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
  • Open Philanthropy Action Fund

A “no” vote would not allow California to sell $5.5 billion in bonds for stem cell research.

Against Prop 14:

  • Jeff Sheehy, board member of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Donors in opposition:

  • None

 

Logan Bik

Prop 15 – Increases funding for K-12 public schools, community colleges and local governments by changing tax assessment of commercial and industrial property

A “yes” vote would tax properties based on market value rather than purchase price. Taxes on commercial properties worth more than $3 million would rise, which in turn fund schools and local governments.

For Prop 15:

  • California Teachers Association
  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • Joe Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee

Donors in support:

  • California Teachers Association
  • Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
  • SEIU California State Council

A “no” vote would tax commercial properties the same, not creating new funding for schools and local government.

Against Prop 15:

  • California NAACP
  • California Chamber of Commerce
  • California Retailers Association

Donors in opposition:

  • California Taxpayers Association
  • California Business Roundtable
  • California Business Properties Association

 

Logan Bik

Prop 16 – Allows diversity as a factor in public employment, education and contracting decisions

A “yes” vote would allow state and local entities to consider race, ethnicity or national origin in public education, employment and contracting. Would effectively restore affirmative action in California

For Prop 16:

  • California State University
  • University of California
  • California Community Colleges

Donors in support:

  • Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals
  • Quinn Delaney, a Democratic donor and founder of Akonadi Foundation

A “no” vote would continue the ban on the consideration of race, ethnicity or national origin in public education, employment and contracting.

Against Prop 16:

  • California Republican Party
  • Californians for Equal Rights
  • Students for Fair Admissions
  • Chinese American Civic Action Alliance

Donors in opposition:

  • Students for Fair Admissions
  • Gail Heriot, a University of San Diego professor

 

Logan Bik

Prop 17- Restores voting rights to people on parole

A “yes” vote would allow people to vote if they are at least 18 years of age upon their release from prison. It would also allow them to run for office so long as they haven’t been convicted of perjury or bribery.

For Prop 17:

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris
  • ACLU of California

Donors in support:

  • Brennan Center for Justice,
  • ACLU of Northern California Board Issues Committee

A “no” vote would continue restricting the right to vote for people who have been released from prison.

Against Prop 17:

  • Crime Victims United of California
  • Election Integrity Project California

Donors in opposition:

  • none

 

Prop 18 – Permits 17 year-olds to vote in primary and special elections

A “yes” vote would allow 17 year-olds to vote in the primary and special elections if they will be 18 years old by the time of the general election.

For Prop 18:

  • California Association of Student Councils
  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • Secretary of State Alex Padilla
  • California School Boards Association
  • Assemblymember Kevin Mullin

Donors in support:

  • California Nurses Association
  • Assemblymember Kevin Mullin for Assembly 2020

A “no” vote would keep the voting age at 18 for any election.

Against Prop 18:

  • Election Integrity Project California
  • Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association

Donors in opposition:

  • none

 

Prop 19 – Changes certain property tax rules for homeowner

A “yes” vote would allow all homeowners over the age of 55, severely disabled or victims who lost their residences due to wildfires or disasters, to be eligible for tax savings when they move anywhere within the state. This would also transfer the primary residence’s tax base to the replacement residence for wildfire or disaster victims.

For Prop 19:

  • California Democratic Party
  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • State Controller Betty T. Yee
  • California Association of Realtors
  • California Professional Firefighters

Donors in support:

  • California Association of Realtors
  • National Association of Realtors
  • California Association of Realtors Issues Mobilization PAC

A “no” vote would allow some homeowners to transfer their tax assessments to homes of equal or lesser value and limit people over the age of 55 to one tax assessment transfer.

Against Prop 19:

  • Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association

Donors in opposition:

  • Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association

 

Joelena Despard

Prop 20 – Restricts parole for certain offenses currently considered to be non-violent

A “yes” vote would mean that people who commit crimes like repeated shoplifting could receive bigger penalties such as longer jail time. The state’s process for early release from prison would involve additional factors. Those found guilty of some misdemeanors would be required to provide DNA evidence.

For Prop 20:

  • Democratic Assemblymember Jim Cooper
  • Republican Assemblymember Vince Fong
  • California Retailers Association

Donors in support:

  • Devin Nunes campaign
  • San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Employees’ Benefit Association
  • Sempra Energy

A “no” vote would mean that penalties for crimes such as repeated shoplifting would not be increased with bigger penalties. The state’s process for early release from prison would not change. DNA samples would only be required for those being arrested for a felony or if they will be required to register as sex offenders or arsonists.

Against Prop 20:

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • California Democratic Party
  • ACLU of California
  • California Teachers Association
  • Chief Probation Officers of California

Donors in opposition:

  • Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

 

Prop 21 – Creates stronger rent control

A “yes” vote would mean that cities and counties could apply stronger rent control than current law.

For Prop 21:

  • California Democratic Party
  • Eviction Defense Network
  • Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders

Donors in support:

  • AIDS Healthcare Foundation
  • California Democratic Party

A “no” vote would mean that current rent control laws in cities and counties would continue to apply.

Against Prop 21:

  • California Apartment Association
  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • Essex Property Trust
  • Prometheus Real Estate Group
  • California Seniors Advocates League

Donors in opposition:

  • Essex Property Trust
  • Equity Residential
  • AvalonBay Communities

 

Joelena Despard

Prop 22 – Allows app-based transportation and delivery companies to reclassify gig workers as independent contractors

A “yes” vote would mean that drivers for app-based delivery and rideshare services could work as independent contractors, which would give them more choices about when and where they work, but they would not get the benefits and protections that employers must provide.

For Prop 22:

  • Uber
  • Instacart
  • Doordash
  • California Chamber of Commerce
  • California Police Chiefs Association
  • California NAACP

Donors in support:

  • Lyft
  • Uber
  • Doordash

A “no” vote would mean that app-based delivery and rideshare services would have to hire drivers as employees, which would give the drivers less control over when and where they work. However, they would get the benefits and protections that employers must provide.

Against Prop 22:

  • Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and Democratic vice-presidential nominee Kamala Harris
  • Service Employees International Union
  • California Teachers Association
  • Gig Workers Rising

Donors in opposition:

  • Service Employees International Union
  • United Health Care Workers
  • State Building and Construction Trades Council of California

 

Joelena Despard

Prop 23 – Requires kidney dialysis clinics to have at least one physician present during operating hours

A “yes” vote would require kidney dialysis clinics to have at least one physician present during operating hours, which would require infection reporting and improve staffing.

For Prop 23:

  • Service Employees International Union United Health Care Workers
  • California Labor Federation
  • California Democratic Party

Donors in support:

  • California Democratic Party
  • Service Employees International Union

A “no” vote would not require kidney dialysis clinics to have at least one physician present during operating hours.

Against Prop 23:

  • DaVita
  • Fresenius Medical Care
  • California Medical Association
  • California NAACP

Donors in opposition:

  • DaVita
  • Fresenius Medical Care
  • U.S. Renal Care

 


 

Joelena Despard

Prop 24 – Expands data privacy laws

A “yes” vote would expand existing privacy and data laws, and the state’s Department of Justice would oversee/enforce consumer privacy laws.

For Prop 24:

  • Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization
  • Consumer Watchdog, a nonprofit organization
  • Californians For Consumer Privacy

Donors in support:

  • Alastair Mactaggart, a San Francisco real estate developer
  • Tom Kemp, co-founder of Centrify
  • Tim Hentzel, CEO of MFN Holdings

A “no” vote would mean that businesses would follow existing data and privacy laws.

Against Prop 24:

  • ACLU
  • Public Citizen
  • Consumer Federation of California

Donors in opposition:

  • Consumer Federation of California
  • California Nurses Association

 


 

Joelena Despard

Prop 25 – Bail would not be required to be released from jail before trial

A “yes” vote would mean that no one could pay bail to be released from jail before their trial. Release would depend on assessed risk of more crimes or they would be released automatically.

For Prop 25:

  • Service Employees International Union
  • California Democratic Party
  • California Medical Association
  • Gov. Gavin Newsom
  • Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon

Donors in support:

  • Steve Ballmer, owner of the L.A. Clippers
  • Connie Balmer, a philanthropist
  • John Arnold, a hedge fund manager

A “no” vote would mean that bail could still be paid to be released from jail before a trial and some people could be released without paying bail.

Against:

  • California NAACP
  • California Peace Officers’ Association
  • California Bail Agents Association
  • Human Rights Watch

Donors in opposition:

  • Triton Management Services, the parent company Aladdin Bail Bonds
  • AIA Holdings, a bail bond and insurance company
  • Bankers Insurance Company

 

Sources:Ballotpedia, CalMatters, VoterGuide