The student media organization of California State University Northridge

Daily Sundial

The student media organization of California State University Northridge

Daily Sundial

The student media organization of California State University Northridge

Daily Sundial

Got a tip? Have something you need to tell us? Contact the Sundial

Loading Recent Classifieds...

Biology major uses past tragedies to reach dreams of medical school

Matt Landesman, 21, is currently a biology major who will be graduating early to enter medical school. Erin Herle / Contributor
Matt Landesman, 21, is currently a biology major who will be graduating early to enter medical school. Erin Herle / Contributor
Matt Landesman, 21, is currently a biology major who will be graduating early to enter medical school. Erin Herle / Contributor

By Erin Herle

For most people, college is a time to figure out their options and where life takes them. Although encouraged, most do not find passion in what they choose for a career, but Matthew Landesman is an exception.

Landesman, 21, is a biology major and pre-med student set to graduate within three and a half years. One could say he is lucky for having carved his path at a young age but it was not by choice that he would stumble upon his passion so early on.

“When I was 14 my father unexpectedly passed away,” he said. “Not only that but I grew up in a family with my mother being disabled and the accumulation of the two lead to me wanting to be a doctor where I could help others and prevent people from living through some of the things I’ve had to as a kid.”

Not every tragedy breeds such an inspiring individual but in Landesman’s case, it has proven through his dedication, extra-curricular involvement and head-on approach into the field of medical research.

A group called American Medical Student Association (AMSA) is a club on campus dedicated to providing guidance, support and information for pre-med students who are striving to be accepted into medical school.

As president of the club, Landesman facilitates meetings, gathers sponsors like the Princeton Review, Kaplan Review and the Gold Standard to provide students with study materials for the MCAT, which might be the most difficult test they will ever take, he said.

Aside from his full load of 17 units and running the club, he also volunteers at the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles where he assists in DNA research under geneticist Dr. Richard Boles, a professor at USC’s Keck School of Medicine where Landesman hopes to soon attend.

Before pondering if he has the time for his hobbies, like fishing, dirt biking and snowboarding, he decided to join the CSUN’s Honors Biology Program.

Landesman’s advice for finding your own passion is, “It feels incredible and the challenge is getting there. Stick with your education, and given some time it will come to you.”

 

More to Discover