Getting sleep even with a snoring roommate

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Courtesy of MCT

The snoring roommate scenario is  well-known within all dorm room communities. These roommates can cause severe irritation for the other party. Many students need eight hours of sleep in order to function well in class. A problem like this can come between two perfectly good roommates, so in an effort to help the situation, it’s important to talk to your roommate, and explain how this problem affects you. Helping your roommate to figure out why he/she snores is the first step to improving both of your sleeping situations.

Changing your attitude about snoring is another way to get in quality sleep time. Have you thought about all the other noises that are taken for granted, like traffic, people talking, and birds chirping? Why don’t these noises bother you as much as snoring does? Think about it this way; Wouldn’t it be great to seize this opportunity to train yourself to become immune to noises like snoring? Wouldn’t it be great to be able to sleep through loud freeway traffic, or a thunderstorm? Who knows how your sleeping situation is going to be at certain times in your life- you might as well start practicing now.

Imagine moving to a big city where the environment is always noisy. At first it can be annoying, but after a while, you start to adapt. Noise becomes just another part of the night because you begin to get used to it.  Apply this philosophy to the situation with your snoring roommates. Stop wishfully thinking about all the things you could have- a quiet room, a bigger bed, softer sheets. Once you get these things, you’ll probably miss your old dorm room and all the memories it holds. Ignoring the snoring will help the situation and the quality of your sleep will eventually improve. It is possible to fall asleep while your roommate is snoring. The problem is, if you spend too much time thinking about the snoring, those thoughts will keep you awake.

If you can’t block out the snoring, try to gently wake your roommate and ask him or her to change the their sleeping position. According to emedicinehealth.com, people tend to snore more while sleeping on their backs. Don’t give up. If the method doesn’t help the first time, repeat this until the snoring stops.

If you manage to fall asleep before your roommate, there is less chance of being disturbed. Earplugs can be another solution. They are great tools to reduce sound, and it is possible to find comfortable ones designed for the purpose.

Being overweight can also add to  reasons for snoring. If a person has a lot of neck fat, the airway can become too narrow, which can make breathing more difficult.

According to emedicinehealth.com, this can be a sensitive issue to bring up and words should be chosen carefully. One way to approach your roommate is to ask if they’d like to join you in a great new exercise class that you’ve just heard about. Or, see if they’d like to begin a walking regimen with your or ask if they’d like to check out your gym.

High alcohol consumption is another reason why many snore. Even those who never snore may start doing so after consuming alcohol. For those who snore regularly, alcohol can make them snore even more. Ask your roommate not to drink too much before he/she goes to bed.

The world won’t crumble just because your roommate snores. If you’re honest with him or her about the problem and try to find the best solution for both of you, it will work out. It is also important that you encourage your roommate to follow the “rules” that you set up together. Maybe you could do something nice for him or her when the sleeping situation improves? Think about this as a preparation for your adult life. This will give you great advantages on living with others in the future.

For all you know, maybe your future wife or husband will be a snorer as well. See it as a learning experience. Your relationship with your roommate may become stronger after coming through this together.


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